Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 20

Social Studies Lesson

Communities in Canada 1780-1850 Grade 3

Victoria Houle, Katelyn Anderson & Krista Frey


Lesson 1 -Beyond the Mind Map
Disciplinary Thinking: Perspective

Overall Expectation: A1. Compare ways of life among some specific groups in Canada around the beginning of
the nineteenth century, and describe some of the changes between that era and the present day

Specific Expectation: A1.1 describe some of the similarities and differences in various aspects of everyday life
of selected groups living in Canada between 1780 and 1850

Prior Knowledge/Skills: Research skills, knowledge about Canada’s past, group work skills

Appropriate Technology: Paper, Pens, Chromebooks/ laptops, Graphic Organizer “Then vs. Now”
Lesson 1 - Minds On
Introduce the new unit by asking students what they know or think
what Canada was like in 1780 -1850’s.
Get students to work on mind maps with their table groups.

Framing questions to be written on the board include:

● What was the community like?


● Challenges they may have faced?
● The roles of Canadians at this time period

Reassure students that you are not looking for the correct answer, just
their ideas!

*Mind Maps if collected or reviewed could be used as assessment FOR


Lesson 1 - Action

Give students graphic organizer sheets “Then vs Now”

Students will work together to organize the images and texts


given, into the two categories

After students have had time to work on their organizers with


their groups get them to reflect in their journals about the
differences from their daily activities and responsibilities to the
early settlers in Canada.
Lesson 1 - Consolidation

Get students to do a gallery walk and compare their organizers to


other tables allowing them to self assess where they are at in
terms of their understanding.

*Assessment AS

Conclude the lesson by summarizing the roles and challenges that


Canadians in the early 19th century faced.
Lesson 2-Field Trip to Pioneer Village
Disciplinary Thinking: Significance

Overall Expectation: A 2. Use the social studies inquiry process to investigate some of the major challenges that
different groups and communities faced in Canada from around 1780 to 1850, and key measures taken to
address these challenges

Specific Expectation: A 2.2 Gather and organize information on major challenges facing different groups and
communities, and on measures taken to address these challenges, using a variety of sources

Prior Knowledge/Skills: knowledge about Canada’s past, group work skills

Appropriate Technology: Paper, Pens, field trip consent forms


Lesson 2 - Field Trip to Pioneer Village
Minds On: To get students excited about this unit they will
get the opportunity to be immersed into a place that is set in
1780- 1860. Students will fill out their journals with
information they learn while at the Pioneer Village.

Consolidation: Back in class any questions students have


about their experience at the Pioneer Village will be
answered.

* Potential for assessment FOR learning, if journals were


collected.

https://blackcreek.ca/book-a-field-trip/#plan
Lesson 3 - Map Construction/Settler
Communities
Overall Expectations: Inquiry - use the social studies inquiry process to investigate some of the major
challenges that different groups and communities faced in Canada from 1780 to 1850, and key measures
taken to address the challenges.

Specific Expectations: A 2.3 Analyze and construct print and digital maps, including thematic maps, as part
of their investigations into challenges facing different groups and communities in Canada during this period,
and measures taken to address these challenges

Disciplinary Thinking: Significance, Cause & Consequence

Big Ideas: Societal and environmental challenges were a major part of life in early-nineteenth-century
Canada

Prior Knowledge/Skills: The basic concepts of Canadian Settlement and a glimpse at lifestyles in 1780 to
1850 Canada
Lesson 3 - Minds On - Read Aloud
Follow That Map: A First Book of Mapping
Skills
● Introduce the concept of mapping and
locations to the students

● Framing Question: Ask the students, who


has seen or used a map before?

● Perform a read aloud of the book “Follow


That Map!” By Scot Ritchie on the carpet to
the students

● Introduce the areas that settlers of Canada


first discovered
Lesson 3 - Action: Building Our Canadian Map
● Each student will receive a blank map of
Canada, much like the one provided.

● They will form groups of 3-4 where they


will work on these maps together

● Each group will receive an iPad to


conduct their research

● Students will label the maps and be


assigned a certain province/territory

● They will investigate the climate


patterns in that assigned area and how
that would affect individuals whom
settled into those geographical regions
Lesson 3 - Consolidation
● Each group has a chance to discuss the climate patterns of their assigned
province/territory
● They will also discuss the struggles the individuals would have when settling in
Canada

* This can be used as an assessment OF learning. As a teacher I will be able to understand


the knowledge and learning the students have gained from exploring their specific
geographical area
Lesson 4 - Canadian Timeline
Overall Expectations: Inquiry - use the social studies inquiry process to investigate some of the major
challenges that different groups and communities faced in Canada from 1780 to 1850, and key measures
taken to address the challenges.

Specific Expectations: A 2.4 - Interpret and analyze information relevant to their investigations, using a
variety of tools to their investigations, using a variety of tools

Prior Knowledge/Skills: The concept of forming a general timeline, a general understanding of Canadian
Settlement and the lifestyles experienced in the past

Disciplinary Thinking: Significance, Cause & Consequence

Big Ideas: Societal and environmental challenges were a major part of life in early-nineteenth-century
Canada

Appropriate Technology: Laptops, paper, markers


Lesson 4 -Canadian Timeline
Minds On:
Refresh students mind of the personal life timelines they explored in previous grades. Then, pull up
the following website page on the smartboard (http://www.scholastic.ca/dearcanada/timeline/).
This link contains a Canadian settlement timeline. Briefly look at each section of the timeline with
the class and have them ask questions if necessary.

Action: Have the students get into groups of 3-4. Each group is assigned a section of the timeline to
examine. The groups will work on computers to construct a brief powerpoint about their section of
the timeline.

Consolidation: The groups will have a chance to pull up their powerpoints and present their findings
to the class. *This can be used as a form of Assessment AS Learning, as the students are able to
reflect on one another's research and presentation.
Lesson 5 - Early Canadian Perspectives
Disciplinary Thinking: Significance; Continuity and
Change

Overall Expectation: A3. demonstrate an


understanding of significant experiences of, and
major changes and aspects of life in, various
historical and contemporary communities in Canada

Specific Expectation A3.1 Identify various First


Nations and some Métis communities in Upper and
Lower Canada from 1780 to 1850, including those
living in traditional territory and those who moved or
were forced to relocate to new areas in response to
European settlement

Specific Expectation A3.3 identify some of the main


factors that helped shape the development of
settlements in Canada during this period
Lesson 5: Early Life for Canadian First
Nations Perspective - Minds On
Video: Students will watch a clip of this video on the Blackfoot Nation in Alberta . Next the class will talk about
First Nations and be asked to identify various First Nations groups they know, and a T-chart will be created
‘What We Know’ ‘What We Want to Know’. Students will form 8 ‘Tribes’ (4 to each group) and learn about a
group in each of the chapters from Aboriginal Peoples in Canada. Next, they will make a mind map of what they
learned about in the chapter and come to the front of the class to explain to the rest of the class what they
learned.
Lesson 5: Early Life for European Settlers
Perspective - Minds On (continued)
Class discussion: Ask students if they know what artifacts are (objects that have been made by people).
Then suggest that students look around the classroom and brainstorm some of the artifacts they see. A list
will be created on the board.

Framing Question: What significant events in different communities have contributed to the development
of the identity of that community and of Canada?

Write on the board: What methods can we use to find out about the challenges faced by people in the past?
What methods can we use to find out how they may have felt about those challenges and how they coped
with them?
Lesson 5 Action: Artifacts and Perspective
Action: Students will get back in their Tribe group of 4, and will be given various artifacts and content
regarding various trades in Early Canada (e.g. blacksmith, baker, fur trapper) and discuss the following
questions: What does this artifact tell you about the person/people who used it? What challenges might people
who worked in this trade or occupation face? Can you imagine what it might be like to live in this time period?
Prior Knowledge: Life in Early Canada, Canadian Timeline, Early
Communities and Maps of Early Canada, Jobs in Early Canada,
Challenges of Early Settlers, Perspective Writing, Writing for a Specific
Audience

Consolidation: Students will write letters from the perspective of a


European settler or a First Nations person using each of the writing
formats, talking about challenges they face and their occupation/trade

Appropriate tools: Writing templates and artifacts (see next slide)

Assessment: As (self-assessment/self-editing) and Of.


Examples of Artifacts
https://blackcreek.ca/buildings/

Pictures of shops and photographs

Samples of letters from Early Settlers


Lesson 6 - Culminating Task: Canadian Settlement
Fair
Prior knowledge: First Nations groups, Early Settler Groups, Great Migration to Canada from
1815-1850. Accumulated artifacts, projects and knowledge from the previous lessons.
Students will split back into their groups and be assigned a different early community group
(e.g. Metis). Students will be given a poster board to collect and present their findings. They will be
encouraged to bring supporting artifacts or items to place on a table so that the fair is interactive.
They will be encouraged to present many different aspects about the settler group with a focus on
the following framing questions: a) what life in Canada was like; b) occupations, trades or farming
practices; c) where they settled; and d) what were their biggest challenges? Students can use
products from previous lesson.
Students from other grade 3 classes will come down to the gym to be a part of the Settlement
Fair. Group members will rotate and visit the other exhibits and ask questions.
Additional Resources
Information and artifacts from the
perspective of Lord Selkirk
http://www.mhs.mb.ca/info/selkirk/settlers
.shtml

Great Upper Canada Adventure:


Interactive game for students
http://sydenhamdiscovery.ca/english/gam
e_flash.asp