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Cisco ITP in eServGlobal IN

Sigtran and ITP Overview

Belgium Support and PS

Dennis Hagarty
Implementation Practice Lead

16 January 2006

© 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal Ltd


Agenda

 Quick introduction to SS7, Sigtran, ITP, IOS


 Introduction to Sigtran
 ITP Model overview with a view of the innards…
 Functions of an ITP (especially as a Signalling Gateway)
 Traffic modes and load distribution
 GTT

 IP Network Design to support the eSG IN


 Time permitting
 Reliance Designs (time permitting)
 SCCP and SUA
 Example traffic flows
 Aligning ITP and hss configurations

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 2 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


The Trainer

 Dennis Hagarty, Implementation Lead, eServGlobal


 dennis.hagarty@eservglobal.com
 Working with ITPs and Sigtran for about four years
 Competed mobile, pre-paid, convergent billing, wireline IN
projects in Europe and Asia-Pacific, on both CDMA and GSM
 More of an IT and less of a telecoms background
 Tell me if my English is not easy to understand or I go too fast!
 Delivered a lot of ITP training, last one was 5 days with Reliance.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 3 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Let’s go!
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 4 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SS7, Sigtran and ITP Basics

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 5 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Quick Introduction to SS7, Sigtran, ITP, IOS

 What is SS7?
 What is Sigtran?
 What is a signalling gateway?
 What is an ITP?
 What is IOS?

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 6 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7: What is it?

 Data network designed to transport CCS signalling traffic that


manages and facilitate call setup, routing and control.
 SS7 was initially designed by the United International
Telecommunications Union (ITU) known than as the CCITT.
 The CCITT created multiple books or standards.
 First came the Yellow Book (1980)
 Red Book (1984)
 Blue Book (1988)
 White Book (1992)
 ANSI standard for US was developed from the Blue Book
 The Bellcore version is based on the ANSI standard and is called
GR-246-CORE: “Bell Communications Research Specifications of
SS7”.
 China, Japan (and others!) have their own flavors

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 7 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7: What is it? SS7 and OSI Protocol Stack

Telnet, FTP,
POP3

TCP/UDP/SCTP

IP

Ethernet

Twisted Pair

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 8 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7: What is it? Signalling Points and Point Codes

 Signalling Points
 SSP: Service Switching Point sends signalling messages to other SSPs
to setup, manage, and release voice circuits required to complete a
call (think “end node”)
 SEP: Signalling End Point SS7 end node that performs similar
functionality to the SSP in an IP telephony network (think “node”)
 STP: Signal Transfer Point is a signalling point that is capable of
routing control messages; that is, a message received on one
signalling link is transferred to another link. (think “router”)
 SCP: Service Control Point contains centralized network databases for
providing enhanced services. An SCP accepts queries from an SP and
returns the requested information to the originator of the query (think
“database” such as DNS).

 Signalling points have “Point Codes” (think IP addresses)

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 9 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7 What is it? Transport Layers

 Three Transport Layers


 MTP1: the signalling data link layer, is concerned with the physical and
electrical characteristics of the signalling links.
 MTP2: is a data link control protocol that provides for the reliable
sequenced delivery of data across a signalling data link.
 MTP3: the signalling network layer, provides for routing data across
multiple STPs from source point to control destination.

 Signalling points have “Point Codes”


 Signalling Points are connected together by “Linksets”
 User and Application Layers

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 10 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7: What is it? Point Codes

 A SEP on an SS7 network has a Point Code (node address)


 There are two “variants” of point code:
 ITU: Value up to 7.255.7 (14 bits)
 ANSI: Varies, but up to 255.255.255 (24 bits)

 Three types of point codes:


 Originating Point Code (OPC) is point code of the source of the original
message
 Destination Point Code (DPC) is the point code of the desired recipient
of the message
 Adjacent Point Code (APC) is the point code for the next hop of the
signalling message

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 11 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7: What is it? Link architecture

eSG
UAS Platform

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 12 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Reliance GSM Pre-Paid
Connected to all
other STP’s SS7 Network
North and West
MSCs STP
MUMBAI KOLKATA
MUM1
Connected to all
other STP’s
GS-UAS01

Prod-ITP01
$$ GS-UBE01 & 02
STP

FDB1
GS-UAS02
SMP
SMP
GS-USMS01 & 02

Connected to all Prod-ITP02


other STP’s GS-UAS03

$ GS-UBE03 & 04
STP

KOL1
GS-UAS04
Connected to all
other STP’s

MSCs

STP

HYD1
SS7 Network
South and East
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 13 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SS7: What is it? Application Parts

 Application Layers
 MAP: Mobile Application Part (MAP), provides the signalling functions
necessary for voice and non-voice applications in a mobile network.
 ISUP: ISDN User Part (ISUP) provides the signalling needed for basic
ISDN circuit-mode bearer services as well as ISDN supplementary
services. ISUP is the protocol that supports ISDN in the PSTN.
 TCAP: Transaction Capabilities Application Part (TCAP), provides the
mechanisms for transaction-oriented and is often used for database
access by the SS7 switches.
 INAP: Intelligent Network Application Part

 Signalling Connection Control Part (SCCP) is used as the


transport layer for TCAP-based services

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 14 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7 What is it? SCCP and GTT/GTA

 Signalling Connection Control Part (SCCP) provides


connectionless and connection-oriented network services and
“global title translation” (GTT) capabilities above MTP3
 SCCP is used as the transport layer for TCAP-based services.
 “Global Titles” are roughly equivalent to “Names” in SS7 and are
defined at the SCCP layer.
 A “global title address” (GTA) can be translated by (e.g.) an STP
into a destination point code and subsystem number.
 A subsystem number uniquely identifies an application at the
destination signalling point (think TCP “port” number)
 GTT adds the ability to perform incremental routing and frees the
originating signalling point of having to know every possible
destination.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 15 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: What is it?

 Set of standards, proposed standards, and drafts


 RFC 2719 Framework Architecture for Signalling Transport
 RFC 2960 Stream Control Transmission Protocol (& 3286)
 IUA = RFC 3057 - ISDN Q.921-User Adaptation Layer along with:
<draft-ietf-sigtran-iua-imp-guide-02.txt>
 M2UA = RFC 3331 SS7 MTP2 User Adaptation Layer
 M3UA = RFC 3332 SS7 MTP3 User Adaptation Layer
 SUA = SS7 SCCP-User Adaptation Layer
RFC 3868 SCCP User Adaptation Layer
 M2PA = MTP2-User Peer-to-Peer Adaptation Layer
RFC 4165 MTP2 User Peer-to-Peer Adaptation Layer
 LAPV5/V5.2 Adaptation Layer
<draft-ietf-sigtran-v5ua-04.txt >

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 16 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: What is it?

 Implements SS7 using the IP protocol as the underlying layers


 Designed around a new IP protocol (mix of UDP and TCP) to meet
the requirements demanded by SS7 signalling:
 reliability
 dependability
 speed

 This is based on SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol)


 The following are probably the most interest to us:
 M2PA = to run MTP3 SS7 linksets over IP
 M3UA = to run non-SCCP traffic (ISUP) over IP (PGW2200, V.SSP)
 SUA = to run SCCP traffic over IP (UAS, VPU)

 Together known as SS7oIP or SIGnaling TRANsport (SIGTRAN)

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 17 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Signalling Gateway: What is it?

INAP INAP
TCAP GTT N
SCCP I SUA TCAP
SCCP F
MTP3 SUA
SS7 MTP3 IP
SCTP IP SCTP
MTP2
MTP2 Network
MTP1 IP
MTP1 IP

SS7 SCTP/IP
SSP ASP

 INAP is still carried by TCAP at the top of the stack


 SCCP is translated into its very close cousin, SUA
 IP, SCTP replace MTP layers
 Applications remain the same, but the connectivity changes…

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 18 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP: What is it?

 Cisco multifunction router (eg Cisco 2600)


 A special purpose computer, with lots of memory but no disks
 Real-time operating system (IOS)
 Port (Interface) cards (Ethernet, E1, ATM, etc)
 Talks TDM SS7 as well as SS7oIP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 19 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP: What is it?

 Cisco multifunction router – a box with CPU, memory, flash


 Operating system (IOS) – Cisco’s Internet Operating System
 Port (Interface) cards
 Hardware is all traditional Cisco components
 Software built into IOS makes the ITP “system”

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 20 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


IOS: What is it?

 Real-time operating system for Cisco Multi-function routers


 Common across just about all of their platforms
 There are a vast number of versions and releases, depending on
the task (IP router, SS7 router, Backbone router, etc)
 White paper “The ABCs of Cisco IOS Software Release”
 The configuration and version of IOS makes it an ITP and defines
what flavour of ITP it will be, and what functions it will perform.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 21 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 22 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Introduction to Sigtran

 What is it?
 A set of IETF Standards to run signalling over IP networks

 What must it do?


 Reliable, fast, robust

 How does it do it?


 SCTP and IP

 Why are we bothered with this stuff?


 What does this mean to us?
 Why not use DK cards?

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 23 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: What is it?

 Set of standards, proposed standards, and drafts


 RFC 2719 Framework Architecture for Signalling Transport
 RFC 2960 Stream Control Transmission Protocol (& 3286)
 IUA = RFC 3057 - ISDN Q.921-User Adaptation Layer along with:
<draft-ietf-sigtran-iua-imp-guide-02.txt>
 M2UA = RFC 3331 SS7 MTP2 User Adaptation Layer
 M3UA = RFC 3332 SS7 MTP3 User Adaptation Layer
 SUA = SS7 SCCP-User Adaptation Layer
RFC 3868 SCCP User Adaptation Layer
 M2PA = MTP2-User Peer-to-Peer Adaptation Layer
RFC 4165 MTP2 User Peer-to-Peer Adaptation Layer
 LAPV5/V5.2 Adaptation Layer
<draft-ietf-sigtran-v5ua-04.txt >

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 24 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: Requirements for Signalling Network

 Not more than one in 1010 of all message signal units must
contain an error that is undetected by the MTP.
 Not more than one in 107 messages will be lost due to failure in
the MTP.
 The availability of any signalling communication path between
two SEPs has to be at least 0.99998 corresponding to a downtime
of at most 10 minutes/year.
 Not more than one in 1010 messages will be delivered out-of-
sequence to the User Parts due to failure in the MTP. This value
also includes duplication of messages.
 In addition there are requirements on message transfer times in
STPs, which under normal conditions are supposed to be less
than 100 mSec, and implicit requirements on limits for the
outgoing queuing delays.
 Message length (payload accepted from SS7 user parts)
272 bytes for narrowband SS7, 4091 bytes for broadband SS7

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 25 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: How is this achieved?

 SCTP: Stream Control Transmission Protocol


 Reliable datagrams and connection oriented – called an “association”
 Concept of “streams”
 An SCTP association provides multiple uni-directional streams
 Message loss on one stream does not delay messages using other
streams, no “head of line” blocking.
 Multihoming: an SCTP endpoint can have multiple IP addresses.
 Timer based retransmission, highly configurable
 Primary and Standby addresses, monitored using heartbeat
 Runs on top of the potentially unreliable IP
 More flexible than TCP: byte oriented, strictly ordered, single homed.
 UDP is connectionless and uses unreliable datagrams.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 26 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: Used in eServGlobal applications

 The following are probably the most interest to us:


 M2PA = to run SS7 linksets over IP
 M3UA = to run non-SCCP traffic (ISUP) over IP (PGW2200, UCA-I)
 SUA = to run SCCP traffic over IP (UAS, VPU)

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 27 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran - Reliability

Resilience Hierarchy

MTP

SCTP Multi-Homing

IP Routing IP Routing

Level 3:
• If SCTP/IP can not correct the issue, MTP3 is notified to initiate standard MTP3
rerouting procedures

Level 2:
• When SCTP Multi-homing detects unresponsiveness in the current IP path, it
changes the IP path used for the session by changing the source and/or
destination IP address of the session. During this process, the SCTP session
remains active and MTP3 is unaware of the path change.

Level 1:
• IP routing protocols can detect path outages and re-route (e.g. HSRP, etc).

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 28 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: M2PA

 M2PA is a peer-to-peer protocol that provides a link between remotely


located MTP3 instances – it replaces the MTP2 layer beneath MTP3. The
user of M2PA is MTP3 at both ends of the connection.
 M2PA provides a means for peer MTP3 layers in SGs to communicate
directly. In essence, it extends the reach of SS7 over the IP network.

M2PA is a
way to
“bridge”
MTP3 over
IP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 29 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Peer to Peer – M2PA

SSP SSP

ISUP/SCCP/TCAP/MAP

MTP3 MTP3

M2PA M2PA

SCTP SCTP

IP IP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 30 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


M2PA through an SG Peer

MTP3 SCTP M2PA


MTP3 MSU FISU M2PA SG MSU M2PA
/IP SP

SS7 IP
SEP SG SEP/SG
TDM

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 31 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: M3UA

 M3UA operates as a client-server to provide an upper layer SS7 with


protocol remote access to the lower layers.
 M3UA provides a means by which an MTP3 service may be provided on an
UAS (eg, terminating the ISUP connection on the UAS) - essentially
extending the reach of SS7 into the IP network.

M3UA is for
USERS of
MTP3!!

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 32 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Signalling Gateway – M3UA

SSP V.SSP

ISUP

Hughes
MTP3 M3UA
Legacy M3UA
and

MTP2 SCTP
SCTP

MTP1 IP Sun IP

Cisco ITP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 33 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


M3UA via a Signalling Gateway

MTP3 MSU

MTP3
MSU MSU M3UA SCTP M3UA
FISU M3UA SG ISUP
User /IP SEP

ISUP

SS7 IP
SEP SG SEP
TDM

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 34 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: SUA

 SUA provides a means by which an Application part (such as TCAP) on an


IP SCP may be reached via an SG.
 The IP SCPs do not have local MTP3 instances, and so do not require their
own SS7 point codes (MTP3, and the point code, can reside on the SG).

SUA is for
USERS of
SCCP!!

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 35 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Signalling Gateway - SUA

MSC UAS

TCAP Application Data

SCCP
GTT
Hughes
MTP3 SUA
SUA
Legacy
and

MTP2 SCTP
SCTP

MTP1 IP Sun IP

Cisco ITP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 36 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SUA via a Signalling Gateway

MTP3 MSU

SCCP

TCAP

SCCP SCCP SCTP SUA


FISU SUA SG SUA
User User /IP SEP

SS7 IP
SEP SG SG
TDM

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 37 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Protocol Architecture

Cisco IOS

SCCP
GTT

MTP3 / MTP3b SUA


M3UA
M2PA
SSCF-NNI
MTP2
SCTP
SCCOP

AAL5 MTP1 IP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 38 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


M3UA / SUA Advantages and Disadvantages

M3UA SUA
 Advantages  Advantages
 ISUP, TUP, SCCP access  Simple for SCCP access only
 SG performs standard GTT  IP service end node does not need
to implement a SS7 layer 3
 Disadvantages adaptation routing protocol
 MTP3 to M3UA mapping can be
more CPU intensive than MTP3  Disadvantages
routing  No ability to participate in ISUP
 NIF is implementation dependent flows
(undocumented) and could make  GTT is adapted within SUA protocol
interoperability challenging which is still being discussed in the
 Designed for IP service end nodes standards group
that do not perform STP MTP3
function

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 39 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran: Used in eServGlobal applications

 The following are probably the most interest to us:


 M2PA = to run SS7 linksets over IP
 M3UA = to run non-SCCP traffic (ISUP) over IP (PGW2200, UCA-I)
 SUA = to run SCCP traffic over IP (UAS, VPU)

 This is too complicated!


 What’s wrong with SS7 cards in the UAS?
 What’s better with the ITP and Sigtran?

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 40 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Traditional IN Protocol Architecture

MSC SCP

TCAP Application Data

SCCP SCCP

MTP3 SINAP, OpenSS7 MTP3


DataKinetics, etc

MTP2 MTP2

MTP1 MTP1

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 41 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


eServGlobal Protocol Architecture

MSC UAS

TCAP Application Data

SCCP
SCCP GTT

SUA Hughes
MTP3 / MTP3b
xUA
MTP3 M3UA
and
M2PA
SSCF-NNI SCTP
MTP2
MTP2
SCTP
SCCOP

MTP1 MTP1 AAL5 IP Sun IP

Cisco ITP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 42 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


With This Knowledge, We’re Off To Look At…

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 43 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


The ITP Model Range

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 44 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Cisco ITP Platforms

Dual Power Number of Max No. No. of SUA &


/ Dual ATM HSL of C7 T1/E1 M2PA MSU
Processor Links Links ports per Sec.
Dual ext
4
265x Power 900
N/A (CPU 4
Low-End Single 2,500
Limit)
Processor
7204/6
Dual Power
VXR 3,000
Single N/A 24 48
Low Mid- 6,000
Processor
range
7301 Dual Power
6,000
Mid Single 8 48 8
12,000
Range Processor

Dual Power
7507/13 14,000
Dual 80/160 800 176
High-End 60,000
Processor

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 45 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Performance

2651 7200 7300* 7500

M2PA MSU/Sec 2,500 6,000 12,000 60,000

M3UA MSU/Sec 1,200 6,000 12,000 20,000

SUA MSU/Sec 900 3,000 6,000 15,000

SIM Authentication / Sec N/A 1,800 3,600 1,800

SIM Authentication plus Auth/Sec N/A 360 720 360

Maximum Routing Table Entries 1,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

Maximum GTT Entries 150,000 500,000 500,000 500,000

Maximum M3UA/SUA Routing Keys 1,000 10,000 10,000 10,000

MTP2 Links per VIP4 / VIP6 N/A N/A N/A 60 / 80

MTP2 MSU per Second per VIP4 / VIP6 VIP4: 4K / 4K


N/A N/A N/A
(IN / OUT) VIP6: 6k / 6K

* = 7300 or 7200 with NPE-G1 processor


N.B. 7500 M3UA and SUA to improve by 30-50% with SUA offload.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 46 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Platforms: 2651XM

 2651XM
 One NM
 Two WIC cards
 2 Fast Ethernet
 40 K PPS
 64MB/128MB DRAM
 16MB/48MB Flash
 External redundant power
 Two x Dual-Port Multiflex
E1 cards
VWIC-2MFT-E1

2651 with 2691

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 47 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Platforms: 7200

7204 with various cards


 7204/7206 VXR
 Four slots in 7204
 Six slots in 7206
 Up to 4/6 FE (TX) available
 400 K PPS
 Dual power and NEBS
 NPE-400 processor
 PA-MCX-8TE1 Port Cards
 I/O Controller with 2 FE

 NPE-G1 processor doubles


performance.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 48 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Platforms: 7200 NPE-400

NPE-400 Processor
 CPU Processor
 350-MHz RM7000A RISC
 4MB L3 cache
 128MB/512MB DRAM
 64MB/256MB Flash
 ECC support

 PA-MCX-8TE1-M
 Shared with 75xx platform
 Comes as 2, 4, or 8 port version
 Only support 24 LSL per 7200

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 49 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Platforms: 7301

 7301
 Single Slot for 8 Port E1
 One RU form factor
 Three FE/GE LAN ports
 900 K PPS

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 50 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Platforms: 7507 and 7513

Route Switch Versatile Interface


Processors (RSP) Processors (VIP)

VIP4-80 / VIP6-80
RSP8 / RSP16 Increase Performance
Second RSP for HA (RPR+)

Industry Leading 70+ LAN &


Port and Services
WAN Adaptors To Choose From Adaptors
Industry leading features
Scalable / high performance
Carrier-class high availability

PA-MCX-8TE1-M (LSL)
2 Power Supplies
PA-A3-8E1IMA (HSL)
for Redundancy
PA-2FE-TX (Ethernet)
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 51 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
ITP Platforms: 7500 VIP Cards

 VIPs can take 2 port adapters with either IP or SS7 media cards
 Lots of CPU intensive processing is pushed down to the VIP.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 52 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7 MTP2 Port Adapter and FE PA

 PA-MCX-8TE1-M
 T1/E1 SS7 Link Port Adapter for
Cisco’s IP Transfer Point (ITP)
 Supports up to 126 MTP2
signalling links over 8 ports of
T1/E1

 Minimum HW Requirements
 7507 or 7513: RSP8, RSP16, VIP4-
80, or VIP6-80
 7204/7206 VXR NPE 400, or G1
 7301

 PA-2FE-TX
 Two FE Slots per PA

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 53 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SS7 ATM HSL Port Adapter

 PA-A3-8E1IMA
 T1/E1 SS7 Link Port Adapter for
Cisco’s IP Transfer Point (ITP)
 Supports up to 8 ATM AAL5
signalling links over 8 ports of
T1/E1
 SSCF and SSCOP run on VIP

 Minimum HW Requirements
 7507 or 7513: RSP8 or RSP16
 7507 or 7513: VIP4-80 or VIP6-80
 7301

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 54 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Standards Compliance

Protocol Specification

ITU-T Q.701-Q.709 White 1996 (inter-works with Blue)


MTP (1, 2, 3)
ANSI T1.111-1996, China

ITU-T Q.711-Q.719 White 1996 (inter-works with Blue)


SCCP
ANSI T1.112-1996, China

ITU E1: Q.2140, Q.2110, Q.2210, Q.2144


High-speed links
ANSI T1: GR-2878, I.363, I.361

IETF RFC 2960: Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP)


SCTP
IETF RFC 3309: SCTP Checksum Change

IETF RFC 4165: Signaling Transport SS7 (Sigtran)


M2PA
MTP2-User Peer-to-Peer Adaptation

M3UA IETF RFC3332: Sigtran SS7 MTP3-User Adaptation Layer

SUA IETF RFC 3868: Sigtran SS7 SCCP-User Adaptation Layer (SUA)

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 55 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


7500 Architecture

Backup RSP
Primary RSP
GTT SUA
GTT SCCP MTP3 Mgmt RSP

SCCPSCCP MTP3MTP3
MTP3
Routing
Routing
Mgmt M3UA

MTP3 RoutingHigh Speed DMA Memory Bus


Shared
Shared DMA Memory
MTP3 / MTP3b Routing MTP3 / MTP3b Mgmt

Shared High Speed DMA Memory

VIP MTP3/SCCP VIP MTP3/SCCP VIP MTP3/SCCP VIP


Forwarding Forwarding Forwarding
MTP3 Fast Cache
MTP3/SCCP MTP3/SCCP MTP3/SCCP
MTP3 Acct / Filter
Screening Screening Screening
MTP2
SSCF-NNI M2PA
SSCOP SCTP SCTP
MTP2 ATM AAL5 IP IP

SS7 LSL SS7 LSL SS7 HSL SS7 HSL Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet Ethernet
PA PA PA PA PA PAIP PA PA PA

SS7 Data Flow Sigtran Data Flow


SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 56 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Why Use ITP in a Network?

 No required architecture changes – ITP supports pure TDM mode. When


using SS7oIP, routing translations are the same for TDM or IP linksets
 Flexibility – when adding capacity for new revenue-generating service
deployment (think Excelcom “banana” and FDA)
 Cost – next generation signalling transport lowers network capital and
operational costs.
 Performance – next generation signalling transport increases the
performance to price ratio per rack with a reduced footprint and power
consumption
 Network efficiencies – next generation signalling transport leverages
investments in both TDM and IP infrastructure
 Intelligent Network Gateway – allows for integration between TDM and IP
networks
 Application layer routing – TCAP, MAP and MAP-user based routing allows
for efficient deployment of new services
 Manageability – IP-based network monitoring and provisioning improve
operational efficiencies

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 57 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Deployment Options for ITP in eSG IN

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 58 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Functions of an ITP

 What is it?
 “Does SS7 stuff!”
 What Functions is it used for?
 Traditional STP
 Next Generation Signalling Transport
 SS7oIP backhaul
 SS7 over High Speed Links
 QoS over IP infrastructure
 Signalling gateway
 SMS Offload (MLR = Multi-layer Routing)
 RADIUS to MAP Authentication
 Why reasons would a carrier use it?
 SS7oIP savings over TDM circuits
 Signalling Gateway

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 59 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP as an ordinary STP

 Basic Configuration for STP


Linkset  SS7 Variant (ANSI, ITU, China)
1234
 Point Code
 Controllers in various slots
SMSC 4321  MTP2 encapsulation on the serial
interfaces
ITP  Define linkset
 Define links in each linkset
2345
 Define Routes

MSC Linkset

Low Speed LINK (LSL)


SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 60 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
ITP Functions: ITP versus Traditional STP

Legacy STP

Cisco
ITP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 61 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Functions: Next Generation Signalling Transport

 Traditional STP  Next-Gen Signalling Transport


 MTP3  SS7oIP Transport:
SIGTRAN M2PA, M3UA, SUA
 Routing, Management, Screening, 

Accounting  Single Box Solution


 Integrating SS7 and IP Routing
 SCCP:
 Industry Leading QoS:
 Full GTT, Management, Screening,
Guarantee bandwidth or latency for high
Accounting, etc

priority SS7 or IP traffic


 Traditional SS7 Transport:  Address Conversion:
 Low and High-Speed Links  Variable length GT digit conversion (Ex:
E.164 to E.212)
 National Variants:
 Multiple Point Codes/Instances
 ANSI, ITU, China, Japan, etc
 Price / Performance Leader by an order
 High Availability: of magnitude
 6 Nines per 7500 Chassis  Efficient Footprint and Power
 SMS Offload

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 62 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Functions: SS7oIP to Supplement the STP Plane

SEP Site
Classical SS7 Transport Network SEP Site

MSC
STP STP
STP STP
SMSC

AAA for
WLAN HLR
or
Next Generation SCP
Signalling Transport

SGSN
Softswitch

Links can be: SGM


• 56/64 Kbits/s
• HSL – Unchannelised T1/E1
• VHSL – Sigtran M2PA
• Sigtran M3UA/SUA

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 63 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Next-Gen Signalling Transport: SS7 over HSL

SCCP SCCP
GTT GTT

MTP3 / MTP3b MTP3 / MTP3b

SSCF-NNI
MTP2 MTP2 MTP2 SS7 Layer
SCCOP 1 and 2
transport
MTP1 MTP1 MTP1 AAL5

T1 or E1 T1 or E1

SS7 layer 2 changes with no layer 3 Changes

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 64 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Next-Gen Signalling Transport: SS7 over IP

MSC
SMSC
ITP ITP
SS7 IP SS7

SS7 SS7
SCCP SCCP
Appl GTT GTT Appl

MTP3 MTP3 MTP3 MTP3

M2PA M2PA
MTP2 MTP2 Peer MTP2 MTP2
SCTP SCTP
Transport
MTP1 MTP1 IP IP MTP1 MTP1

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 65 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Sigtran and SS7 Packets through an SG

MTP3 FISU MTP3 SCTP M2PA


MSU
M2PA SG MSU
M2PA / IP
SP

MTP3
MSU+ FISU MSU M3UA M3UA
M3UA SG MTP3 SCTP
User User / IP SEP

SCCP + FISU MSU


SCCP SUA
SUA SG SUA SCTP
User User / IP SEP

IP
SEP SS7 SG SEP
TDM

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 66 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Next-Gen Signalling Transport: SS7 over IP (cont)

MTP2 TDM M2PA/SCTP


ITP

MSU4

MSU3 SCTP Chunk Bundling Timeout


(0 ~ 10 msec configurable)
MSU2

MSU1

MSU4 MSU3 MSU2 MSU1 IP

Example: Up to 1480 bytes for Ethernet

FISUs will be terminated at ITP

FISU FISU MSU FISU MSU FISUFISUFISU MSU MSU IP

Available Bandwidth
for Other MSU Transport

0.4 Erlang
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 67 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
ITP Next-Gen Signalling Transport: SS7 over IP (cont)

 QOS in SS7oIP Networks – Classify, Queue, Preserve


 ITP map MSUs to IP QoS by using any combination of MSU values -
 Input link set (ex: link set from SMSC)
 Service Indicator (ex: ISUP or SCCP)
 Destination Point Code (ex: MSU destined to SMSC)
 Global Title Address (ex: TT or MSIDN of SMSC)
 M3UA/SUA Routing Key

IP Packet Header
TOS Protocol Type Source Destination Source/Destn
IP

Address Address Port


(DSCP/ IPPrec)

Core Router
IP Core
SS7 / MTP Sigtran / IP Network
ITP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 68 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Next-Gen Signalling Transport: SS7 over IP (cont)

Classification / Marking – By Input Linkset


Ethernet
Physical Facility Link from MSC Interface
IP Prec=1 SS7 Traffic from MSC
T1 / E1

Link from SCP IP Prec=3 SS7 Traffic from SMSC

T1 / E1 IP Prec=5 SS7 Traffic from SCP


Link from SMSC

Classification / Marking – By Service Indicator Classification


Ethernet
Physical Facility
MSC Interface

T1 / E1
IP Prec = 1 ISUP Traffic: SI=5
MSC
IP Prec=5 SCCP (SMS) Traffic
T1 / E1 SI=3
SMSC

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 69 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Functions of a Signalling Gateway

 A Signalling Gateway is a bridge between SS7 and SS7oIP world:


 Converts SCCP to SUA
 Converts MTP3 to M3UA
 Allows peer-to-peer connections with M2PA
 What Functions is it used for?
 Global Title Translation
 MTP3 routing, failover and aggregation
 SS7oIP traffic routing, load-balancing and failover
 Traffic accounting, management and debug
 Why do we want to use it?
 Means we don’t need MTP hardware and SCCP stacks on our UAS
 Means we can easily scale with customer load
 CHEAP! IP technology is open, universal and fiercely competitive

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 70 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


ITP Functions: Signalling Gateway

MAP MAP
TCAP GTT N
SCCP I SUA TCAP
SCCP F
MTP3 SUA
MTP3
SCTP IP SCTP
MTP2
MTP2 Network
MTP1 IP
MTP1 IP

SS7 SCTP/IP
SEP ITP ASP

MAP IS-41I T GTT MAP IS-41 I T


S U S U
TCAP U P TCAP U P
SCCP P
SCCP SCCP P
N

MTP3 MTP3 I
F
M3UA M3UA
MTP2 SCTP IP SCTP
MTP2
Network
MTP1 MTP1 IP IP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 71 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SUA/M3UA: Traffic Modes

 Broadcast
 Traffic sent to all Active ASP’s within an AS.

 Override
 One Active ASP in an AS. One ASP takes over all traffic for an AS
(primary/backup operation), possibly overriding any currently active
ASP in the AS.
 Fail-over to backup ASP.

 Loadshare
 Traffic shared among all Active ASP’s within an AS.
 Algorithm is one of:
 bindings - SLS-based load share (default)
 Round robin – distributed equally amongst the ASP in the AS
 Weighted Round Robin – distributed in a weighted fashion

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 72 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Traffic Mode Broadcast

SCCP messages to 2109


Signalling Gateway
ASPA
ACTIVE STP
AS BLUE

ASPB
STP
ACTIVE

ASPC
ACTIVE
AS Blue
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SI SCCP
ASP List = ASPA, ASPB, ASPC
Traffic Mode = Broadcast

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 73 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Traffic Mode Override

SCCP messages to 2109


Signalling Gateway
ASPA
ACTIVE STP
AS BLUE

ASPB
STP
INACTIVE

ASPC
INACTIVE
AS Blue
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SI SCCP
ASP List = ASPA, ASPB, ASPC
Traffic Mode = Override

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 74 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


CDMA Override – 1 PC

CDMA-Prod-01

Faisalabad STP Prod-ITP1


PC = 5952 PC = 8439 (A c tive)
A S1 -PC1
U
e)
STP M1ITP01FDBS1 it v Primary PC = 8431
c
(A
1
S1 C
-P SSN = 14
UM 1

ITP02-ITP01
1M AS
0 U
ITP
1
M UA
M S2
1I -P
TP
02 C 1
FD (In
B S1 ac
tiv
e)
UAS2-P
STP M1ITP02MUMS1 C1 (Ina CDMA-Prod-02
ctive)

Mumbai STP Prod-ITP2


PC = 9024 PC = 8440
FW-UAS03

Secondary PC = 8431
SSN = 14

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 75 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


CDMA Override – 2 PC

CDMA-Prod-01

Faisalabad STP Prod-ITP1


PC = 5952 PC = 8439 (A c tive)
A S1 -PC1
U
e)
PC 2 ( Inactiv ve)
UAS1-
STP M1ITP01FDBS1 i
ct e) Primary PC = 8431
(A it v Secondary PC = 8432
1 c
S1 P C
( Ina
UM 1- 2 SSN = 14

ITP02-ITP01
S
0 1M U
A -PC
1 ITP
A S1
M UUA
M S2
1I UA -P
TP
02 S2 C1
FD -P (In
B S1 C2 ac
(A tiv
c e)
UAS2-P tiv
STP M1ITP02MUMS1 C1 (Ina CDMA-Prod-02
ctive) e)
U AS 2
Prod-ITP2 -PC2
Mumbai STP ( Activ
PC = 8440 e)
PC = 9024
FW-UAS03

Primary PC = 8432
Secondary PC = 8431
SSN = 14

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 76 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


CDMA Override Example (Failure)

CDMA-Prod-01

Faisalabad STP Prod-ITP1 )


PC = 5952 PC = 8439 1 ( Inactive
- PC
UAS1
e) )
PC 2 (Inactiv ive
UAS1-
STP M1ITP01FDBS1
a ct e) Primary PC = 8431
n iv
(I t Secondary PC = 8432
1 ac
S1 C (In
UM 1 -P 2 SSN = 14

ITP02-ITP01
1M AS C
0 U 1 -P
TP
1 I AS
M UUA
M S2
1I UA
TP -P
02 S2 C1
FD -P (A
B S1 C2 ct
(A iv
c e)
UAS2-P tiv CDMA-Prod-02
STP M1ITP02MUMS1 C1 (Ac
tive) e)
U AS 2
Prod-ITP2 -PC2
Mumbai STP ( Activ
PC = 8440 e)
PC = 9024
FW-UAS03

Primary PC = 8432
Secondary PC = 8431
SSN = 14
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 77 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Traffic Mode Loadshare (Bindings)

SCCP messages to 2109


0, 3, Signalling Gateway
ASPA
ACTIVE STP
AS BLUE

1, 4,
ASPB
STP
ACTIVE

2, 5,
ASPC
ACTIVE
AS Blue
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SI SCCP
ASP List = ASPA, ASPB, ASPC
Traffic Mode = loadshare bindings

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 78 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Traffic Mode Loadshare (Round Robin)

SCCP messages to 2109


every
Signalling Gateway
ASPA
ACTIVE STP
AS BLUE
third

ASPB
ACTIVE STP

packet

ASPC
ACTIVE
AS Blue
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SI SCCP
ASP List = ASPA, ASPB, ASPC
Traffic Mode = loadshare roundrobin

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 79 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Traffic Mode Loadshare (Weighted Round Robin)

SCCP messages to 2109


50% Signalling Gateway
ASPA
ACTIVE STP
AS BLUE

30%
ASPB
STP
ACTIVE

20%
ASPC
ACTIVE
AS Blue
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SI SCCP
ASP List = ASPA, ASPB, ASPC
Traffic Mode = loadshare roundrobin weighted

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 80 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Loadshare Example

GS-UAS01

Kolkata STP Prod-ITP1


tive)
PC = 4416 PC = 8439 1 (A c
GS - U AS

e )
STP M1ITP01KOLS1 iv
c t Voice/SMS/USSD
(A PC = 8435
1
D S1 AS
U
HY S-
ITP02-ITP01
P01 G
1I
T G
M S- Camel Voice
UA
M S2 SSN = 146
1I
TP (A
02 ct
KO iv
LS e)
1
GS-UA GS-UAS02
STP M1ITP02HYDS1 S2 (Ac
tive)

Hyderabad STP Prod-ITP2


PC = 320 PC = 8440
FW-UAS03

Voice/SMS/USSD
PC = 8435

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 81 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SUA: Multiple SSN Scenario

SCCP messages to SSN 8


Signalling Gateway
ASPA
ACTIVE STP
AS BLUE

ASPB AS GREEN
ACTIVE STP

AS Blue
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SSN 8, SI SCCP
ASPC ASP List = ASPA, ASPB, ASPC
INACTIVE Traffic Mode = Loadshare
AS Green
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SSN 11, SI SCCP
ASP List = ASPB, ASPC
Traffic Mode = Override

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 82 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


SUA: Multiple SSN Scenario

SCCP messages to SSN 11


Signalling Gateway
ASPA
STP
AS BLUE

ASPB AS GREEN
ACTIVE/STANDBY STP

AS Blue
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SSN 8, SI ISUP
ASPC ASP List = ASPA, ASPB, ASPC
OVERRIDE Traffic Mode = Loadshare
AS Green
Routing Key = DPC 2109, SSN 11, SI SCCP
ASP List = ASPC, ASPB
Traffic Mode = Override

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 83 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Loadshare Example (Voice and SMS)

GS-UAS01

Kolkata STP Prod-ITP1


PC = 8439 c tive)
PC = 4416
- U A S1 (A
GS

S 1 (A ctive) e)
STP M1ITP01KOLS1 GS-SM ct
iv
) Voice/SMS/USSD
(A tive PC = 8435
1 c
AS
1 (A
DS U 1
Y
S-
ITP02-ITP01
H S
01 G S M Camel Voice
TP G -
1I S- GS SSN = 146
M UA
M S2
1I
TP (A MAP SMS
02 ct
KO iv SSN = 8
G e)
LS S-
1 SM
GS-UAS S
STP M1ITP02HYDS1 2 (Activ 2 (A GS-UAS02
e) c
tiv
GS-S e)
Prod-ITP2 MS2
Hyderabad STP (Acti
PC = 8440 ve )
PC = 320
FW-UAS03

Voice/SMS/USSD
PC = 8435

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 84 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Loadshare Failover (Voice + SMS)

GS-UAS01

Kolkata STP Prod-ITP1


n)
PC = 4416 PC = 8439
AS 1 (dow
GS-U
)
M S1 (down n)
STP M1ITP01KOLS1 GS- S
dow n)
Voice/SMS/USSD
( w PC = 8435
1 o
DS
1 AS (d
Y S-
U S1
ITP02-ITP01
H M
P01 G
G -S Camel Voice
1I
T S- GS SSN = 146
M UA
M S2
1I
TP (A MAP SMS
02 ct
KO iv SSN = 8
G e)
LS S-
1 SM
GS-UAS S
STP M1ITP02HYDS1 2 (Activ 2 (A GS-UAS02
e) c
tiv
GS-S e)
Prod-ITP2 MS2
Hyderabad STP (Acti
PC = 8440 ve )
PC = 320
FW-UAS03

Voice/SMS/USSD
PC = 8435

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 85 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Global Title: Intermediate versus Final

 Final GTT – is a translation that inserts a PC into the SCCP header


that is the final destination
 Result is usually an End Point (SEP)
 Routing indicator (RI) bit is set to “route on PC/SSN”
 Intermediate GTT – is a translation that inserts a PC into the
SCCP packet to an intermediate point that will again perform GTT
 Result is another node which will perform GTT
 Routing indicator (RI) bit is left cleared to “keep routing on GT”

Intermediate Final
GTT DPC = ITP2 GTT DPC = UAS
DPC = ITP1
RI = GT RI = GT RI = PC/SSN
MSC
UAS
ITP1 ITP2

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 86 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


GTT and Cost Based Load-Sharing

 This is how cost based load sharing works:


 Final:
ITP
Incoming Traffic GTT
Final
1 Point Code 1
C o st =
STP MTP3 Linkset
C o st
=2

Point Code 2

 Intermediate:
ITP
Incoming Traffic GTT
Intermediate STP MTP
3 Li
Co st = 1 nks
e t
MTP3 Linkset
PC 1
STP Cost = 2
set
3 Link
MTP
STP

PC 2

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 87 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


GTT and SLS Based Load-Sharing

 This is how cost based load sharing works:


 Final:
ITP
Incoming Traffic GTT
Final
Point Code 1
50 %
STP MTP3 Linkset
50%

Point Code 2

 Intermediate:
ITP
Incoming Traffic GTT
Intermediate STP MTP
3 Li
50% nks
e t
MTP3 Linkset
PC 1
STP 50% set
3 Link
MTP
STP

PC 2

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 88 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Debug Commands

 We have to be VERY careful with DEBUG


 DON’T EVER, EVER, EVER turn it on in production

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 89 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Network Designs

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 90 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Network Design to Support eSG IN

 We need to design a solid, reliable network to support the IN


 It must be redundant, fast and (mostly) dedicated
Network
Enables access to Facility Machines
Function
External Access NTP, SNMP, syslog, Users FWT All

Replication Service Data (IN Internal) Both All non ITP

Billing IN Billing elements GSM UAS, USMS, UBE

Sigtran IP Signalling elements Both UAS and ITP

Cluster Private Cluster I/C GSM USMS

Alarm NTP, SNMP, syslog, Users GSM All

Backup Path to backup server FWT UAS, USMS

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 91 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


GSM UAS/USMS Connectivity

Replication Replication

Q Q
Billing F F Billing
E E
0 1
MB
Sigtran A Sigtran B

Cluster Cluster

Alarm

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 92 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Server Port Allocation (GSM)

Server 1st QFE Quad LAN Card 2nd QFE Quad LAN Card
Port ce0 ce1 ce2 ce3 ce4 ce5 ce6 ce7

USMS Replcn. Billing Cluster Replcn. Billing Cluster

Sigtran Sigtran
UAS Replcn. Billing
A
Replcn. Billing
B

UBE Replcn. Billing Replcn. Billing

Server Motherboard
Port Port 0 Port 1
USMS Alarm
UAS Alarm
UBE Alarm

 Same failures as before, although alarms failover could be better

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 93 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Server Port Allocation (CDMA FWT)

Server Mother Board QFE Quad LAN Card

Port ce0 ce1 ce2 ce3 ce4 ce5

USMS Replication External Replication N/A External Backup

UAS Replication Sigtran A Replication Sigtran B External Backup

 Any single board or switch failure can be tolerated


 Each cable on the same network uses a different IP switch
 Any two port/cable failures can be tolerated (not on the same net
on the same machine i.e. ce0 and ce2 above on the one
machine)
 Really requires one more port on the UAS (GSM has that)

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 94 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


CDMA Replication Network Design

97.253.108.0/26 97.253.108.0/26

Switch Switch
97.253.108.12
97.253.108.10 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.11

UAS1
97.253.108.15
97.253.108.13 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.14

UAS2
97.253.108.18
97.253.108.16 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.17

LAN 2
LAN 1

UAS3
97.253.108.21
97.253.108.19 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.20

UAS4

Not Connected Not Connected


ITP 1

Not Connected Not Connected


ITP 2
97.253.108.24
97.253.108.22 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.23

U-SMS

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 95 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


CDMA Signalling Network Design

97.253.108.128/26 97.253.108.192/26

Switch Switch

97.253.108.140 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.204

UAS1

97.253.108.150 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.214

UAS2

97.253.108.160 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.224

LAN 2
LAN 1

UAS3

97.253.108.170 Sun s
SD

97.253.108.234

UAS4

97.253.108.134 97.253.108.198

ITP 1

97.253.108.135 97.253.108.199

ITP 2

Not Connected Not Connected


SD

Sun s

U-SMS

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 96 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


CDMA External Network Design

97.253.109.0/27

Switch

97.253.109.10
Not Connected
SD

Sun s

NTP Server UAS1


97.253.25.106
97.253.109.11
Not Connected
SD

Sun s

syslog Server UAS2


97.253.1.49
97.253.109.12
Not Connected
SD

Sun s
LAN 1

UAS3
SNMP Server
97.254.0.56 97.253.109.13
Not Connected
SD

Sun s

UAS4
SNMP Server
97.253.109.20
97.253.0.179 Not Connected
ITP 1

97.253.109.21
Not Connected
ITP 2

97.253.109.17
97.253.109.19
SD

Sun s

97.253.109.18 U-SMS

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 97 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


Planning is Essential!

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 98 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


References 1/1

 Tutorials and External References


http://www.pt.com/tutorials/ss7/
“Signaling transport over IP-based networks using IETF standards”
Klaus D. Gradischnig and Michael Tüxen
RFC 3286 An Introduction to the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP)
“Signaling System #7” by Travis Russell
SCCP standard is Q.713
http://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu-t/rec/q/q500-999/q713_23786.html

 Cisco ITP documentation


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/wirelssw/ps1862/index.html

 Cisco IOS documentation


http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/software/ios122/122cgcr/ffun_
c/fcfbook.pdf

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 99 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal


References

 Cisco ITP web site


 Thorough, but a little difficult to find your way around, use Google!!
 www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/wirelssw/ps1862/index.html
 The ITP is generally a “Wireless Product”
 I can supply PDF of the command and operations guides

 Cisco IOS Documentation (also on the Production CD)


 http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/index.htm

 Sigtran, especially SCTP and SUA


 http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2960.txt for the SCTP RFC
 http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3868.txt for the SUA RFC
 http://www.sigtran.org/ for pointers to a large number of references

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 100 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Glossary

European Telecommunications
ETSI IETF Internet Engineering Task Force
Standardisation Institute
GTT Global Title Translation HDLC High Level Data Link Control
IP Internet Protocol ISUP ISDN User Part
ITU International Telecommunications Union IUA ISDN User Adaptation layer
M2PA MTP2 Peer-to-peer user Adaptation layer M2UA MTP2 User Adaptation layer
M3UA MTP3 User Adaptation layer MEGACO Media Gateway Control (IETF WG)
MG Media Gateway MGC Media Gateway Controller
MGCP Media Gateway Control Protocol MTP Message Transfer Part
PSTN Public Switched Telephone Network RTP Real Time Protocol
SCCP Signalling Connection Control Part SCP Service Control Point
SCTP Stream Control Transport Protocol SG Signalling Gateway
Sigtran Signalling transport (IETF Working Group) SIP Session Initiation Protocol (IETF WG)
SP SS7 Signalling Point SS7 Signalling System No. 7
SSN Sub-System Number SSP Service Switching Point
STP Signalling Transfer Point TCAP Transaction Capabilities Application Part
UA User Adaptation layer V5UA V5.2-User Adaptation layer

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 101 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Who’s Hungry?

That’s all Folks!

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 102 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Reliance Designs

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 103 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
GSM Overview
Connected to all
other STP’s SS7 Network
North and West
MSCs STP
MUMBAI KOLKATA
MUM1
Connected to all
other STP’s
GS-UAS01

Prod-ITP01
$$ GS-UBE01 & 02
STP

FDB1
GS-UAS02
SMP
SMP
GS-USMS01 & 02

Connected to all Prod-ITP02


other STP’s GS-UAS03

$ GS-UBE03 & 04
STP

KOL1
GS-UAS04
Connected to all
other STP’s

MSCs

STP

HYD1
SS7 Network
South and East
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 104 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
CDMA Overview
Connected to all
other STP’s SS7 Network
North and West
MSCs STP
MUMBAI
MUM1
Connected to all
other STP’s
FW-UAS01

Prod-ITP01

STP

FAR1
FW-UAS02

SMP
FW-USMS01

Connected to all Prod-ITP02


other STP’s FW-UAS03

STP

KOL1
FW-UAS04
Connected to all
other STP’s

MSCs

STP

HYD1
SS7 Network
South and East
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 105 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
CDMA Override Example

CDMA-Prod-01

Faisalabad STP Prod-ITP1


PC = 5952 PC = 8439 (A c tive)
A S1 -PC1
U
e)
PC 2 ( Inactiv ve)
UAS1-
STP M1ITP01FDBS1 i
ct e) Primary PC = 8431
(A it v Secondary PC = 8432
1 c
S1 P C
( Ina
UM 1- 2 SSN = 14

ITP02-ITP01
S
0 1M U
A -PC
1 ITP
A S1
M UUA
M S2
1I UA -P
TP
02 S2 C1
FD -P (In
B S1 C2 ac
(A tiv
c e)
UAS2-P tiv
STP M1ITP02MUMS1 C1 (Ina CDMA-Prod-02
ctive) e)
U AS 2
Prod-ITP2 -PC2
Mumbai STP ( Activ
PC = 8440 e)
PC = 9024
FW-UAS03

Primary PC = 8432
Secondary PC = 8431
SSN = 14

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 106 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
CDMA Override Example (Failure)

CDMA-Prod-01

Faisalabad STP Prod-ITP1 )


PC = 5952 PC = 8439 1 ( Inactive
- PC
UAS1
e) )
PC 2 (Inactiv ive
UAS1-
STP M1ITP01FDBS1
a ct e) Primary PC = 8431
n iv
(I t Secondary PC = 8432
1 ac
S1 C (In
UM 1 -P 2 SSN = 14

ITP02-ITP01
1M AS C
0 U 1 -P
TP
1 I AS
M UUA
M S2
1I UA
TP -P
02 S2 C1
FD -P (A
B S1 C2 ct
(A iv
c e)
UAS2-P tiv CDMA-Prod-02
STP M1ITP02MUMS1 C1 (Ac
tive) e)
U AS 2
Prod-ITP2 -PC2
Mumbai STP ( Activ
PC = 8440 e)
PC = 9024
FW-UAS03

Primary PC = 8432
Secondary PC = 8431
SSN = 14
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 107 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
GSM Loadshare Configuration

GS-UAS01

ve)
Kolkata STP Prod-ITP1 GS-UAS1 (Acti
PC = 4416 PC = 8439
GS-SMS1 (Active) )
e
tiv
STP M1ITP01KOLS1 c
(A Voice/SMS/USSD
S 1
PC = 8435
1 - UA
DS GS e)
Y iv
ITP02-ITP01
H c t Camel Voice
P01 (A
1I
T S1 SSN = 146
M M
M -S GS
1I GGSS -U
TP -S AS MAP SMS
02 M 2 SSN = 8
KO S2 (A
LS (A ct
ct iv
1 iv e)
e)
M1ITP02HYDS1 GS-UAS02
STP
GS-UAS2 (Active)
Hyderabad STP Prod-ITP2
PC = 320 PC = 8440 GS-SMS2 (Active)
FW-UAS03

Voice/SMS/USSD
PC = 8436

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 108 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
GSM Loadshare Configuration (Failure)

GS-UAS01

n)
Kolkata STP Prod-ITP1 GS-UAS1 (dow
PC = 4416 PC = 8439
GS-SMS1 (down)
wn)
STP M1ITP01KOLS1 o
(d Voice/SMS/USSD
S 1
UA PC = 8435
-
S1 GS
D n)
HY
ITP02-ITP01
ow
01 (d Camel Voice
P
1I
T S1 SSN = 146
M M
M S-S GS
1I GGS -U
TP -S AS MAP SMS
02 M 2 SSN = 8
KO S2 (A
LS (A ct
ct iv
1 iv e)
e)
M1ITP02HYDS1 GS-UAS02
STP
GS-UAS2 (Active)
Hyderabad STP Prod-ITP2
PC = 320 PC = 8440 GS-SMS2 (Active)
FW-UAS03

Voice/SMS/USSD
PC = 8436

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 109 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SCCP and SUA

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 110 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SCCP and GTT/Routing

 Groan…
 The most important thing to get out of this is:
 There are UDT, XUDT packet formats (amongst others)
 XUDT has HOPCOUNT and SEGMENTATION parameters
 There is Class 0 and 1 connectionless traffic
 The format is complicated (don’t try to decode on paper)
 Routing, GTT (covered more in the SUA section)

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 111 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SCCP Protocol Classes

 The SCCP protocol classes are defined as follows:


 Protocol class 0 provides unordered transfer of SCCP-user messages
in a connectionless manner.
 Protocol class 1 allows the SCCP-user to select the in-sequence
delivery of SCCP-user messages in a connectionless manner.
 Protocol class 2 allows the bi-directional transfer of SCCP-user
messages by setting up a temporary or permanent signalling
connection.
 Protocol class 3 allows the features of protocol class 2 with the
inclusion of flow control. Detection of message loss or mis-
sequencing is included.
 Protocol classes 0 and 1 make up the SCCP connectionless
service.
 Protocol classes 2 and 3 make up the SCCP connection-oriented
service.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 112 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SCCP Message Types

Message type Classes Message


Reference
0 1 2 3 Code
CR Connection request X X 4.2 0000 0001
CC Connection confirm X X 4.3 0000 0010
CREF Connection refused X X 4.4 0000 0011
RLSD Released X X 4.5 0000 0100
RLC Release complete X X 4.6 0000 0101
DT1 Data form 1 X 4.7 0000 0110
DT2 Data form 2 X 4.8 0000 0111
AK Data acknowledgement X 4.9 0000 1000
UDT Unitdata X X 4.10 0000 1001
UDTS Unitdata service X1 X1 4.11 0000 1010
X = Type of message of this protocol class.
X1 = Type of protocol class is indeterminate (absence of protocol class parameter).

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 113 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SCCP Message Types

Message type Classes Message


Reference
0 1 2 3 Code
ED Expedited data X 4.12 0000 1011
EA Expedited data acknowledgement X 4.13 0000 1100
RSR Reset request X 4.14 0000 1101
RSC Reset confirm X 4.15 0000 1110
ERR Protocol data unit error X X 4.16 0000 1111
IT Inactivity test X X 4.17 0001 0000
XUDT Extended unitdata X X 4.18 0001 0001
XUDTS Extended unitdata service X1 X1 4.19 0001 0010
LUDT Long unitdata X X 4.20 0001 0011
LUDTS Long unitdata service X1 X1 4.21 0001 0100
X = Type of message of this protocol class.
X1 = Type of protocol class is indeterminate (absence of protocol class parameter).

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 114 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Packet Formats and Reference

 Do you want to know some of the details of SUA?


 Well, you are going to see more than some, but you need to see
the detail to get the big picture.
 The most important thing to get out of this is
 The destination and source address formats and tags.
 There are CLDT and CLDR
 We won’t cover DUNA, DAVA, etc in much detail.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 115 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-CLDT 1/3

 Connectionless Data Transfer (CLDT) message transfers data


+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0006 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
/ Routing Context /
\ \
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0115 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Protocol Class |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0102 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
/ Source Address /
\ \
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0103 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 116 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-CLDT 2/3

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
/ Destination Address /
\ \
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0116 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Sequence Control |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0101 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| SS7 Hop Count |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0113 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Importance |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 117 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-CLDT 3/3

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0114 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Message Priority |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0013 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Correlation ID |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0117 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Segmentation |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x010b | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
/ Data /
\ \
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

 A Connectionless Data Response (CLDR) is a “service” message

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 118 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-Source/Destination Address

 SUA Source Address


0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x0102 | Parameter Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Routing Indicator | Address Indicator |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
/ Address parameter(s) /
\ \
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

 The following combinations of address parameters are valid:


 Global Title (e.g. E.164 number) + optional PC and/or SSN, SSN may be zero, when routing
is done on Global Title
 SSN (non-zero) + optional PC and/or Global Title, when routing is done on PC + SSN. The PC
is mandatory in the source address when sending from SGP to ASP, and in the destination
address when sending from ASP to SGP to reach the SS7 SEP.
 Hostname + optional SSN, when routing is done by Hostname
 SSN (non-zero) and optional IP address when routing is done on IP address + SSN

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 119 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D Address-Routing Indicator

 Routing Indicator
 The following values are valid for the routing indicator:
 Reserved 0
 Route on Global Title 1
 Route on SSN + PC 2
 Route on Hostname 3
 Route on SSN + IP Address 4

 The ROUTING indicator determines which address parameters are


to be used in routing the traffic to the destination.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 120 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D Address-Address Indicator

 “Address indicator” is coded as follows:


 Bit 1 is used to indicate inclusion of the SSN
 0 Do not include SSN when optional
 1 Include SSN
 Bit 2 is used to indicate inclusion of the PC
 0 Do not include PC, regardless of the routing indicator value
 1 Include PC

 Bit 3 is used to indicate inclusion of the Global Title


 0 Do not include GT when optional (routing indicator /= 1)
 1 Include GT

 The remaining bits are spare and SHOULD be coded zero, and
MUST be ignored by the receiver.
 The ADDRESS indicator determines which address parameters
need to be present in the address parameters field.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 121 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D Address-Global Title 1/5

 Global Title
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x8001 | Length |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Reserved | GTI |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| No. Digits | Trans. type | Num. Plan | Nature of Add |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
/ Global Title Digits /
\ \
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

 Number of Digits:
 This is the number of digits contained in the Global Title.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 122 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D Address-Global Title 2/5

 Global Title Indicator


0000 Reserved
0001 Nature of Address is ignored. Translation Type = Unknown
and Numbering Plan = E.164 (value 1).
0010 This is most commonly used in North American networks.
The Translation Type implicitly determines Nature of Address
and Numbering Plan. This data can be configured in the SG.
The number of digits is always even and determined by the
SCCP address length.
0011 Numbering Plan and Translation Type are taken over. It is
implicitly assumed that the Nature of Address = Unknown.
0100 This format is used in international networks and most
commonly in networks outside North America. All information
to populate the source address is present in the SCCP
Address.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 123 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D Address-Global Title 3/5

 Numbering Plan:
0 unknown
1 ISDN/telephony numbering plan (E.163 and E.164)
2 generic numbering plan
3 data numbering plan (Recommendation X.121)
4 telex numbering plan (Recommendation F.69)
5 maritime mobile numbering plan (E.210, E.211)
6 land mobile numbering plan (E.212)
7 ISDN/mobile numbering plan (E.214)
8 – 13 spare
14 private network or network-specific numbering plan
15 - 126 spare
127 reserved.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 124 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D Address-Global Title 4/5

 Translation type:
0 Unknown
1 – 63 International services
64 – 127 Spare
128 – 254 National network specific
255 Reserved
 Nature of Address:
0 unknown
1 subscriber number
2 reserved for national use
3 national significant number
4 international number
5 – 255 Spare

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 125 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D Address-Global Title 5/5

 Global Title:
Octets contain a number of address signals and possibly filler as shown:
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|2 addr.|1 addr.|4 addr.|3 addr.|6 addr.|5 addr.|8 addr.|7 addr.|
| sig. | sig. | sig. | sig. | sig. | sig. | sig. | sig. |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| ............. |filler |N addr.| filler |
| |if req | sig. | |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

All filler bits SHOULD be set to 0.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 126 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D PC and SSN

 Point Code
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x8002 | Length = 8 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Point Code |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
 Subsystem Number
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Tag = 0x8003 | Length = 8 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Reserved | SSN value |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 127 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Message Formats-S/D-SSN Values

 The Subsystem Number (SSN) identifies an SCCP user function


00 SSN not known/not used
01 SCCP management
02 reserved for ITU-T allocation
03 ISDN user part
04 OMAP (Operation, Maintenance and Administration Part)
05 MAP (Mobile Application Part)
06 HLR (Home Location Register
07 VLR (Visitor Location Register)
08 MSC (Mobile Switching Centre)
09 EIC (Equipment Identifier Centre)
0A AUC (Authentication Centre)
0B ISDN supplementary services
0C reserved for international use
0D broadband ISDN edge-to-edge applications
0E TC test responder
0F-1F reserved for international use
20-FE reserved for national networks
FF reserved for expansion of national and international SSN.

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 128 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Protocol Parameters

 These parameters are specific to the SUA protocol:

Parameter Name ID Parameter Name ID


SS7 Hop Counter 0x0101 Source Address 0x0102
Destination Address 0x0103 Source Reference No. 0x0104
Destination Reference No. 0x0105 SCCP Cause 0x0106
Sequence Number 0x0107 Receive Sequence No. 0x0108
ASP Capabilities 0x0109 Credit 0x010A
Data 0x010B Cause / User 0x010C
Network Appearance 0x010D Routing Key 0x010E
DRN Label 0x010F TID Label 0x0110
Address Range 0x0111 SMI 0x0112
Importance 0x0113 Message Priority 0x0114
Protocol Class 0x0115 Sequence Control 0x0116
Segmentation 0x0117 Congestion Level 0x0118

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 129 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SCCP Message Formats-Source/Destination Address

 For comparison, this is an SCCP header:


 SUA is quite a bit longer…

8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Nat/Intnl Routing Point Subsystem
Indicator Indicator Global Title Indicator Code Number Bit
Indicator Indicator
OCTET Pos
Subsystem Number
Signaling Point Code
Global Title

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 130 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
SUA Management Message Mapping

SUA Primitive to/from ASP MTP Primitive to/from SS7

CLDT (Payload data) UDT/XUDT

CLDR (Payload data) UDTS/XUDTS

DUNA (Destination Unavailable) MTP-PAUSE (TFP) or SSP

DAVA (Destination Available) MTP-RESUME (TFA) or SSA

SCON (Network Congestion State) MTP-STATUS (TFC) or SSC

DUPU (Destination User Part Unusable MTP-STATUS (UPU)

DRST (Destination Restricted) MTP-STATUS (TFR)

DAUD (Destination State Audit) Link or subsystem status

SPMC* network congestion TFC

SPMC* network unavailable TFP

* SPMC – signalling Point Management Cluster (Group of AS’s sharing a single PC).

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 131 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Some Example Traffic Flows

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 132 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Initial Trigger
MSC
DPC = 8439 or 8440
GTA = Common Single GT PC = 4177
RI = GT SSN = 146
MSC = 91988300 0555

STP The MSC will trigger the subscriber based


PC = 320 on one of the four SCP ISDN’s that it has
or 4415 been provisioned for.
There will be no SSN in the SCCP header.
ATM Link The MTP3 DPC will be loadshared to the
two ITP point codes, and failover to the
M1ITP01KOLS1 or other if the primary fails.
M1ITP02KOLS1

DPC = 8439 or 8440


GTA = one of 4 SCP ISDN 2
RI = GT

2 gta 9198xx002400 app-grp GSM-MOX-ALL

cs7 gtt application-group GSM-MOX-ALL


multiplicity share
pc 8435 ssn 146 1 pcssn
pc 8436 ssn 146 2 pcssn 3 Assume the round robin selects UAS1
pc 8437 ssn 146 3 pcssn
pc 8438 ssn 146 4 pcssn
cs7 gtt map 8435 146 solitary 4

cs7 as GS-UAS1-AS sua


routing-key 100 8435 si sccp ssn 146 5
asp GS-UAS1-ASP UAS
PC = 8435
cs7 asp GS-UAS1-ASP 14001 15010 sua SUA Association SSN = 146
remote-ip 97.32.12.76
6 remote-ip 92.37.12.140
GTA = 919827002400

7 exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 8435 -ssns 146 -rcbase 100 -rcstep 10 \
8 -port 14001 -stps 8439,8440 \
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 133 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
-netaddr 97.32.12.76 -secondary_netaddr 92.37.12.140
Initial Response
DPC = 4417 MSC
SSN = 146
GTA = 919883xxxxxx PC = 4177
RI = GT SSN = 146
MSC = 919883xxxxxx

STP
PC = 320
or 4415

ATM Link

M1ITP01KOLS1
DPC = 4417
SSN = 146
GTA = 919883xxxxxx
RI = GT

Assume the traffic is returned via ITP01


5 cs7 linkset M1ITP01KOLS1 4416

4
update route 4177 16383 linkset M1ITP01KOLS1 priority 4

cs7 gtt selector UAS-MSC tt 0 gti 4 np 1 nai 4


gta 919883 pcssn 4177 gt UAS
PC = 8435
3 SUA Association SSN = 146
GTA = 919827002400

2 #!/bin/sh
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
1 -pc 8435 -ssns 146 -rcbase 100 -rcstep 10 \
-port 14001 -stps 8439,8440 \
-netaddr 97.32.12.76 -secondary_netaddr 92.37.12.140
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 134 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
MSC
DPC = 8439 or 8440
GTA = one of 4 SCP ISDN PC = 4177
SSN = 146
Subsequent
RI = GT
MSC = 919883xxxxxx
1

STP
PC = 320
or 4415

ATM Link

M1ITP01KOLS1 or
M1ITP02KOLS1

DPC = 8439 or 8440


GTA = one of 4 SCP ISDN 2
RI = GT UAS1
PC = 8435
SSN = 146
7
3 gta 919827002400 app-grp GSM-MOX-GT1 GTA = 919827002400

#!/bin/sh
cs7 gtt application-group GSM-MOX-GT1 exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
multiplicity cost -pc 8435 -ssns 146 -rcbase 100 -rcstep 10 \
-port 14001 -stps 8439,8440 \
pc 8435 ssn 146 1 pcssn 4 -netaddr 97.32.12.76 -secondary_netaddr 92.37.12.140
pc 8436 ssn 146 2 pcssn

cs7 gtt map 8435 146 sol


UAS2

SUA Association
5 cs7 as UAS1-AS1 sua
routing-key 100 8435 si sccp ssn 146 UAS3
asp UAS1-ASP1 6
cs7 asp UAS1-ASP1 14001 15010 sua
remote-ip 97.32.12.76
remote-ip 92.37.12.140 UAS4
SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 135 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Aligning ITP and UAS Configurations

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 136 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Example Sigtran Configuration – UAS

 hssScIf.sh
#!/bin/ksh
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 \
-sendorigaddr true \
-port 14001 \
-rcbase 101 -netaddr 172.20.66.66 \
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \
-stps 3210,3211 \
-maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 –conntimer 5 \
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 -rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \
-assoc_max_retrans 6 -path_max_retrans 3 -maxSctpModeRetry 10 \
-sccp itu -proto any \
-inapssns 12 \
>> /IN/service_packages/SLEE/tmp/hssScIf.log 2>&1
 peers.conf
peers
# Signalling Gateway Peers
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.68 172.20.66.100 )
peer ( 2 SG 1 3211 15000 172.20.66.69 172.20.66.101 )
dummy 2:

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 137 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Example Sigtran Configuration - ITP

 SUA
 Defines the local IP port for incoming SUA connections
cs7 point-code 3210

cs7 sua 15000


local-ip 172.20.66.68
local-ip 172.20.66.100
assoc-retransmit 6
path-retransmit 3
retransmit-timeout 500 5000
tx-queue-depth 2000

 ASP
 Builds the IP streams for each ITP – UAS connection
cs7 asp SYDSCP01-ASP 14001 15000 sua
remote-ip 172.20.66.66
remote-ip 172.20.66.98

 AS
 Sets the Point Code and SSN for each ASP
cs7 as SYDSCP01-AS sua
routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
asp SYDSCP01-ASP

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 138 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations

 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
-sendorigaddr true \ assoc-retransmit 6
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
-sccp itu -proto any \  AS
-inapssns 12,146 \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70 cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
172.20.66.102 ) routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197 asp SYDSCP1-ASP
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 139 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations - STP/ITP Point Code
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
-sendorigaddr true \ assoc-retransmit 6
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
-sccp itu -proto any \  AS
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70 cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
172.20.66.102 ) routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197 asp SYDSCP1-ASP
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 140 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – ITP SUA Port
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 141 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – IP Addresses
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 142 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – Retransmission Parameters
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 143 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – Timeout Parameters
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10 retransmit-timeout 500 5000
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 144 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – UAS SUA Port
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10 retransmit-timeout 500 5000
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 145 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – ITP ASP and SUA Instance
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10 retransmit-timeout 500 5000
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 146 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – UAS IP Addresses
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10 retransmit-timeout 500 5000
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 147 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – Routing Keys
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10 retransmit-timeout 500 5000
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 148 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – UAS Point Codes
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10 retransmit-timeout 500 5000
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 149 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal
Sigtran Configurations – Sub-System Numbers
UAS ITP
 hssScIf.sh  SUA
#!/bin/ksh cs7 point-code 3210
exec ../bin/hssSccpTcapInterface \
-pc 3212 -ssns 12,146 -port 14001 \ cs7 sua 15000
assoc-retransmit 6
-sendorigaddr true \
path-retransmit 3
-rcbase 101 -rcstep 10 retransmit-timeout 500 5000
-netaddr 172.20.66.66 \ local-ip 172.20.66.70
-secondary_netaddr 172.20.66.98 \ local-ip 172.20.66.102
-stps 3210,3211 -maxdids 132000 \
-asmode 1 -conntimer 5 \  ASP
-rto_init 1000 -rto_max 5000 \ cs7 asp SYDSCP1-ASP 14001 15000 sua
-rto_min 500 -hb_interval 10 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.66
-assoc_max_retrans 6 \ remote-ip 172.20.66.98
-path_max_retrans 3 \
 AS
-sccp itu -proto any \ cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS1 sua
-inapssns 12,146 \ routing-key 101 3212 si sccp ssn 12
 peers.conf asp SYDSCP1-ASP
# Signalling Gateway Peers
cs7 as SYDSCP1-AS2 sua
peer ( 2 SG 1 3210 15000 172.20.66.70
routing-key 111 3212 si sccp ssn 146
172.20.66.102 )
asp SYDSCP1-ASP
peer ( 3 SG 2 3211 15000 172.19.40.197
172.19.40.229 )

SIGTRAN and ITP Overview | 150 | © 2003 Cisco Systems © 2006 eServGlobal