Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 20

A 3D SCIENTIST

by:
MR. MILANER R. OYO-A
Discussant
1. D - Dreamer

• We don’t reach anything because we


don’t dream anything.

• Your DREAM must be BIG!!!


• You have to leave your comfort zone
• In comfort there is complacency
2. D- Designer
• If you don’t design it you will lose the
opportunity to have it.

• I have to design it, so that I will know how


to accept it or reject it.
3. D-Doer
• Get busy!

• It doesn’t matter with your HISTORY you


can begin.
And now…….

• HERE is another D , which is the


DISPLAY
THE Display Board
by:
MILANER REYES OYO-A
Region VIII
When you plan your science fair
board, remember this is a case in
which you CAN judge a book by its
cover. If you do a really superb job
at completely your display,
everyone will stop to look at your
project. However, if you do a
messy job, no one will take the time
to discover all the fascinating
research you’ve done.
PLAN YOUR BOARD
• Make small sketch of where everything will
go
• Design what the “center” of your board will
be.
• When you set-up your board, put things
together in an order that makes sense.
REMEMBER: we read from left to right.
COMPONENTS OF YOUR BOARD
• A. TITLE
- catch the attention
- concise
- accurate
- descriptive
- self-explanatory
• The phrase “A Study
to Show” should be
avoided, because in
research you do not
seek to prove
something, but rather
to impartially find an
answer.
B. RESEARCH
• You might want to include a short
paragraph that gives the background
information on which you based your
hypothesis.

C. HYPOTHESIS
This is your educated guess
based on your research.
D. ABSTRACT
- short paragraph of
not more than 200 to
250 words
- gives the essential
or principal features
of the project study
- descriptive
- informative
E. Experiment
This is the procedure you followed to
do your experiment. It should follow the
scientific method and include:
MATERIALS
PROCEDURE
CONSTANTS and VARIABLES
F. Data – these are your results
displayed in a way that your audience
can understand. It is usually displayed
in a table, graph or photographs. It is
an “analysis” of what you have done.

G. Conclusion – This is a statement of


whether your hypothesis was right or
not; if it wasn’t right, why you think it
turned out the way it did, and what you
do differently next time.
EXTRAS: You should have
at least one of the
following:

Illustrations – These can be


photographs that you
took.

Actual Model or experiment


– this is the actual
equipment you did at
home or a model of your
topic.
COLORS AND TEXT:

1. You can use the labels that come with your board or
create your own. Labels created on the computer
can be very effective. Try using a different font or
color for each of the labels.

2. Use colors that are appealing. They should contrast


with your board color. If you have a white board,
make your text a bright color(s). Try backing your
text with colored paper to make your words alive.

3. Type your text or print it neatly. Use premade letters


if you prefer. Make your lettering large enough for
everyone to see. If you print it, use pencil first and
draw guidelines to make sure your writing is neat.
DISPLAY YOUR DATA

You may display your data in a table or graph.


Make sure your graph reflects the kind of data
you have collected.

A line graph demonstrates change over time

A bar/picture graph demonstrates a


comparison between two or more things.

A circle/pie graph compares parts to the whole


THE MAXIMUM SIZE OF PROJECT
DISPLAY MUST BE:
Before
• 76 cm (30 inches) deep
• 122 cm (48 inches) wide
• 183 cm high excluding table
Now
35 cm deep (wings)
65 cm wide (central part)
90 cm high
NOT ALLOWED AT PROJECT OR IN BOOTH
1. Living Organisms, including plants
2. Human or animal food
3. Human/animal parts or body fluids (for example, blood, urine)
4. Preserved vertebrate or invertebrate animals
5. Plant materials (living, dead or preserved) which are in their view
raw, unprocessed or non-manufactured state
6. Laboratory/households chemicals
7. Poisons, drugs, hazardous substances or devices
8. Dry ice or other sublimating solids
9. Sharp items (for example, syringes, needles, knives)
10. Flames or highly flammable materials
11. Batteries with open-top cells
12. Photographs depicting vertebrate animals in surgical techniques,
dissections, improper handling methods and improper housing
conditions
13. Glasswares
14. Computer units & peripherals
“Recipe for success: study while others
sleeping; work while others are
loafing; prepare while others are
playing; dream while others are
wishing.”
-William A. Ward-

Damo nga Salamat!!!