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PACKAGING AND ITS

IMPACT ON BRAND &


SALES

PRESENTATION PACKAGED
BY
FAREED SAGHIR .N (09AB08)
JOS KURIAN E. (09AB16)
HISTORY OF PACKAGING
 Oldest packaging were with animal skins, leaves and
vegetables.

 By Roman times and Egyptian, containers were being


made of clay and other materials. Later, glass, metal
and paper were introduced.

 The can was developed to solve the problem of keeping


food fresh for the troops during the Napoleonic Wars.

 In Victorian times, butter & cheese were kept in baskets,


vinegar in barrels, tea in chests & grain in sacks.

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Contd..
 In 1795, Napoleon offered a prize to anyone in
France who could come up with an idea which
would keep food safe for his soldiers

 By the Second World War, the steel can looked like


cans we have today

 Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) under the


Ministry of Food Processing Industries regulates
the packaging norms for processed foods.

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Definition of PACKAGING
 Packaging is the science, art and
technology of enclosing or protecting
products for distribution, storage, sale and
use.

 Packaging is a coordinated system of


preparing goods for transport,
warehousing, logistics, sale and use.

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Contd..
 Packaging also refers to the process of
design, evaluation, and production of
packages.

 Packaging helps the consumer quickly


understand what the product is all about

 Packaging is a silent sales man.

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ROLE OF PACKAGING
Packaging is ‘indispensable’ for shopping as we know it
today – supermarkets cannot exist without it.

 Product wastage in supply chain is very


minimal.

Product presentation and information are key elements

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CONTRIBUTIONS OF PACKAGING
INDUSTRY

 Developed a fantastic range of new products

 Enabled a huge change in the way we shop

 Facilitated the reduction in food waste in the supply


chain

 Light weighted packaging

 Gives consumers product protection, hygiene;


convenience and pack information

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MAIN DEMANDS ON PACKAGING

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PURPOSE OF PACKAGING
Physical protection

Information transmission

Marketing

Security

Convenience

 Agglomeration

 Portion control

 Prevention of pilferage & tampering

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ATTRIBUTES OF PACKAGING
Utilitarian

Sensory

Visual

Communicative

Psychological Attraction

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Contd..
Utilitarian

Protection

Transportation

Storage

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Contd..

Sensory

Textural

Fragrance

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Contd..

Visual

Expressive

Aesthetic

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Contd..
Communicative

To identify

To instruct

To persuade

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Contd..

Psychological

Value Addition

Personality

Emotive

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NEED FOR EFFECTIVE
PACKAGING
To cater the changing market trends

To capture the market share

To enhance brand image

To add value to product

To increase sales

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DURING THE 1950’S…
 Shopping was a daily exercise – no fridges!
 Grocers shops
 No supermarkets
 Most products sold loose – queues
 Home deliveries of milk, bread on
everyday basis
 Range was limited and fresh food seasonal
 Convenience foods almost unheard of

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DURING THE 1950S…

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AND NOW..
 Consumption has increased dramatically
 Supermarkets are everywhere
 Range and choice are huge
 Products available all year round
 Convenience is ‘everything’
 And it’s this consumer demand for goods
that
drives demand for the packaging around
it

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NOW,…

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IMPACTS OF PACKAGING
Sales

Brand

Price

Consumer Buying behavior

Shipping

Environment

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IMPACT ON SALES
Research shows consistent evidence of the power

of structural innovation that leads to enhanced


sales.

Unique packaging structures can enhance

Shelf visibility,

Differentiate brands from their competitors

Boost customer satisfaction through improved

functionality.

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CONTD..
90% of respondents preferred to buy
products with packaging.

61% are loyal in buying a brand mainly


because it is a well packed product.

45% of respondents are influenced by


packaging and are willing to pay more for it
Ready to switch from one brand to
another because of a packaging.
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Packaging Vs Sales
Sales in volume

Time (Product Life Cycle)


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TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE
IMPACT
Maximum emphasis to maintain the quality
level of packaging to make the customer
more loyal in buying their brands.

Attention should be given to increase and


maintain the level of comfort and durability
to increase the customer’s loyalty.

Continuously work on innovative designs of


packaging to retain customers.

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IMPACT ON BRAND

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The Shape of the package can be
recognized as unique to
a particular brand.

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The Brand: El Palacio de Hierro
The Aim: El Palacio de Hierro, a chain of luxury department stores in Mexico,
asked designers Alexander Isley revamp its image, providing the stores with
consistency and brand recognition, and distinguishing the chain as an icon.
The Strategy: Alexander Isley recommended a rich golden yellow with a
deep brown trim as the chain's signature color and applied it to all boxes,
packaging and communication materials to provide the chain with a signature
look, graphic format and color scheme. "Bags can be a huge marketing tool for
a department store, yet at El Palacio de Hierro there was no consistency and
as a result very little brand recognition," explained Aline Hilford, Managing
Director for the agency.

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The Brand: Millicare
The Aim: Millicare, a green friendly corporate carpet and textile
maintenance franchise, was suffering from a lack of brand recognition
because its presence in most offices was during off-hours. The aim was to
have design firm The Moderns rebrand Millcare's image by creating a
clear identity and visual presence.
The Strategy: Through a comprehensive rebranding, the agency
leveraged Millicare's product packaging and vehicular facades to act as
advertisements for the brand, thus achieving greater brand presence at a
relatively minor expense.

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The Brand: Kleenex
The Aim: To incorporate elements of design and style into an
everyday product that would take it out of the bedroom, making
it suitable for the living room, and would also attract younger
consumers to the brand.
The Strategy: While the original Kleenex box continues to exist,
Kimberly Clark also developed an oval box in recent years. The
newly designed boxes, released as holiday editions in 2005, were
so successful that they ranked as the top selling facial tissues in
the weeks leading up to the holiday.

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The Brand: Wellington Cordage
The Aim: In order to achieve product differentiation, rope
makers Wellington asked Proteus to design a rebrand, a key part
of which was the repackaging of its product.
The Strategy: Based on insights that consumers were most
interested in how strong the product was, Proteus created a new
packaging system. It also displaced the traditional plastic bag for
a branded strap, ensuring much longer lasting brand-recognition.

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The Aim: P&G's global Herbal Essences brand employed LPK to
help make its mark in the hair-care market and differentiate itself
on the shelf.
The Strategy: The firm came up with a design from scratch that
featured attention-grabbing, uncomplicated, color-coded
packaging. The 2006 rebrand launch was extremely successful:
three of the top five customers increased Herbal distribution by
over 25% and four times as many displays were shipped versus
any past launches. In the first three months, Herbal Essences
experienced a 6% increase in overall volume share.

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The Brand: Dove
The Aim: Unilever brought on design firm Raison Pure to
transition its image from primarily a cleansing brand to a beauty
brand, and to achieve consistency amongst the various dove
logos and representations globally, while simultaneously
achieving differentiation in the marketplace.
The Strategy: The products were repackaged accordingly, to
lend an impression of elegance and beauty rather than just
convenience and cleanliness

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The Brand: Remrandt
The Aim: In an attempt to radically rebrand its newly acquired
oral healthcare line, Johnson & Johnson created a packaging plan
to achieve shelf differentiation and also to create a product that
provided consumers with a meaningful experience, one that
transcended the functionality with which oral healthcare had
traditionally been associated.
The Strategy: The hallmark of the repackaging campaign was
simplification: the new boxes were white and uncluttered.
Retailers were also asked to shelf the entire brand in one
location, creating a noticeable wall of white.

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Symbols used on packages
and labels

Fragile Do not use hand hooks This way up

Bar codes Keep away from water

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Packaging Preference

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The “INCONVENIENT
TRUTH” of Packaging
 Its environmental impact is regretful
 Modern society cannot function without
it.

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