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SEMINAR

ON
SKILL DEVELOPMENT AND HANDS ON

PRESENTED BY:- PREETI PARNNA


CHAMPA HANSDAH
BASUDEV PANIGRAHI
BIPLAB KU. BEHERA
RAJESH KU. DUTTA
KANHU CH. PADHY
SOURAV MAJHI
SURAJ PRATAP SWAIN
DEPT. OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
TALK FLOWS :-
 INTRODUCTION
 REED BED TREATMENT SYSTEM
 CLASSIFICATIONS
 WORKING
 ADVANTAGES & DISADVANTAGES
 RESULTS
 DISCUSSIONS
 CONCLUSION
 REFERENCES
INTRODUCTION :-
Reeds are coarse grasses growing in wet places.
Reed bed is one of the natural and cheap
methods of treating domestic, industrial and
agricultural liquid wastes. It is considered as an
effective and reliable secondary and tertiary
treatment method where land area is not a major
constraint .
A reed bed is essentially a basin that is lined
with an impermeable membrane, filled with
gravel and planted with macrophytes such as
reeds and rushes. Wastewater (black or
grey)passes through the root zone of the reeds
where it undergoes treatment via physical,
chemical and biological interactions between
the wastewater, plants, micro-organisms, gravel
and atmosphere.
REED BED TREATMENT SYSTEM :-
Reed bed technology was developed in Germany in the 1960s by
Dr. Käthe Seidel. The principle of this technology is to activate microbial processes
that stimulate the natural breakdown of polluting compounds in a specific waste
water situation. Reed bed treatment systems essentially comprise self-contained,
artificially engineered wetland ecosystems. They utilise particular
combinations of plants, soils, bacteria, substrates and hydraulic flow systems to
optimise the physical, chemical and microbiological processes naturally present
within the root zone of the plants.
The reed bed treatment system combines
aerobic and anaerobic decomposition
processes in a 1.0 m thick soil or substratum
layer. The polyethylene lined and refilled
basins are planted with helophytes like
Phragmites communis, Typha latifolia,
Typha angustifolia or other
aquatic macrophytes
Polyethylene Cattle Trough Reed
Bed planted with Lomandra hystrix
TYPES OF REED BED :-
I. Reed bed based on type of macrophytic growth
a. Reed beds with free floating macrophytes

(A) Lemna (B) Spirodela


b. Reed beds with floating- leaved macrophytes

(A). Water lily


(B) Lotus
c. Reed beds with submerged macrophytes

(A) Phragmites australis (B) Oenanthe javanica

d. Reed beds with emeragent macrophytes

(A) Typha angustifolia (B) Zizania latifolia


II. Reed bed based on type of Construction
a. Surface Horizontal Flow (SHF)
b. Subsurface Horizontal Flow (SSHF)
c. Down Flow or Vertical Flow (VF)
WORKING OF REED BED:-
ADVANTANGES & DISADVANTAGES:-
ADVANTAGES :-
1) It achieves standards for tertiary treatment with low cost, such as no
electricity, no chemicals for pH adjustment.
2) Low maintenance cost, since it involves no machinery and its
maintenance.
3) It requires negligible attendance for operation and monitoring.
4) It has no sludge handling problem.
5) It enhances the landscape and gives the site a green appeal.
6) It provides natural habitat for birds and after few years gives an
appearance of bird sanctuary and also provides recreational and
educational areas.
7) Though it is a sewage treatment plant it doesn t have odour problems.
8) It becomes a green Zone and it does not have mosquito problem.
Contd...
9) Above all it provides eco friendly solution to waste water treatment
Naturally .
10) The reeds are not grazed by ruminants.
11) Salinity may not be a problem for a survival or operations of reed
beds.
12) It is recommended to combine vertical flow and then horizontal
flow of sewage with a soil having impervious bottom.

DISADVANTAGES :-
1. Relatively area requirements for advanced treatments.
2. Current imprecise design and operating criteria
3. Biological and hydrological complexity and our lack of important process
dynamics.
4. Possible problems with pests.
5. Steep topography, shallow soils and high water tables, susceptibility to severe
flooding may limit the use of constructed wetlands.
RESULTS :-
DISCUSSIONS :-
The results show the concentrations of five
parameters for wastewater treated by conventional
treatment plant, root zone system and simple filter
bed system. It is clear that the use of Reed bed
system is best for the treatment of all parameters
when compared to the other two. There is a
remarkable reduction in pH, B.O.D, C.O.D by Reed
bed treatment and the treated water has become fit
enough to be let out directly into a receiving water
body as the concentrations are below allowable
limits. Thus the root zone treatment can be used
independently or as an addition to conventional
treatment so as to make the final output fit
enough for discharge into a natural water body.
Sample Before and After treatment
CONCLUSION:-
It has been observed that reed beds system for treatment of wastewater
using the floating plant system is a predominant method which is
economic to construct requires little maintenance and increase the
biodiversity. The removal efficiency of contaminants like TSS, TDS,
BOD, COD, EC, hardness, heavy metals, etc varies from plant to plant.
Plant growth rate and hydraulic retention time can influence the
reduction of contaminants. Therefore, an available knowledge and
techniques for removal of water contaminants and advances in waste
water treatment can be integrated to assess and control water pollution.
REFERENCES
1. American Public Health Association., (1992), Standard Methods for the
Examination of Water and wastewater, 18th. Ed. APHA Publication, Washington
D.C.
2. Babbit. H. E., and E. R. Baumann., (1960),. Sewage and sewage Treatment, Asia
Publishing House., Bombay, 8th. Ed.
3. Bhide. W.D., (1982), Disposal and Utilization of Urban sewage for irrigation –
Cost benefit, IAWPC Tech, A (9), pp 7–15.
4. Bouchard. R., (1995), Using constructed wetland pond system to treat agricultural
runoff: A watershed perspective, Lake Reservoir Management, 1(1), pp 29-36.
5. CPCB. (2000), Guidelines on construction, operation and application of root zone
treatment system for treatment of municipal and industrial wastewater, New
Delhi.
6. Crites. R.W., (1994), Design Criteria and practices for constructed wetlands,
Water science and Technology, 29 (4), pp 1-6.
7. Bansari M. Ribadiya Int. Journal of Engineering Research and Applications
ISSN :2248-9622, Vol. 4, Issue 12( Part 3), December 2014, pp.15-18