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Chest Ovens

TRADITIONAL CHEST OVENS


Single Cell Die Ovens – 20 yrs ago!

Japan
Single Cell Die Ovens

Visual Die Management

Warren, Ohio, U.S.A.


Single Cell Die Ovens
Die Heating Curve

Castool Test Oven


Test Oven

Recent
Upgrades

Goal
95% C.I.
Temp.

+/- 5 C

Past
Performance
87% C.I.
Thermocouple Location

Existing (high temp.)


New (process control)
Single Cell Die Ovens
Motorola MC68HC16Z1
Micro Controller

ALLOWS FOR EFFECTIVE VISUAL MANAGEMENT


Alcoa Feltre
Alcoa Feltre
Architectural Extruder
Lid Locking Mechanism
Dummy Block Life
Castool E3 & HP Dummy Blocks

25 degrees

30 degrees
Dummy Block Expansion

.030”/.762mm dia.
Design Criteria

Criteria to Determine Block Design


•Liner ID
•Stem shaft diameter
•Press tonnage
•Alloy
•Billet Temperature
•Cycle time
Design – E3 (Replaceable Ring)
BLOCK CLEARANCE

.030/.035”
[0.8mm/0.9mm]
(1XXX - 3XXX ALLOY)

.040/.055”
[1.1mm/1.3mm]
(4XXX - 6XXX ALLOY)

>.045” [>1.1mm]
(7XXX - 8XXX ALLOY)

E3 BLOCK TO RUN ON PRESSES WITH PRESSURE LESS THEN 110,000 PSI


Dummy Block RRB E3
CRITICAL GAP .040/.045”
[1.0mm/1.1mm]
1.52” [38.61mm] CLEARANCE
(6XXX ALLOY)

ADJUST
MECANICAL
EXPANSION .050”
GAP (1.27mm)
Maintenance E3
Replacing clearance
Example – Nominal ring
dimension =
9.360±.002”⍉
“IF” permanent set is
+.010”/+.020” then turn
diameter back to nominal.

“IF” permanent set is


greater then +.020”
then turn diameter
back to nominal and
replace .050” GAP by
removing .050” off
.050” 1.27mm GAP back of mandrel
Design – HP (High Pressure Shell)
BLOCK CLEARANCE

.025/.030”
[0.6mm/0.8mm]
(1XXX - 3XXX ALLOY)

.035/.040”
[0.9mm/1.0mm]
(4XXX - 6XXX ALLOY)

>.040” [>1.0mm]
(7XXX - 8XXX ALLOY)

HP BLOCK TO RUN ON PRESSES WITH PRESSURE GREATER THEN 110,000 PSI


Dummy Block HP (High Pressure)
CRITICAL GAP .035/.040”
1.52” [38.61mm] [0.9mm/1.0mm]
CLEARANCE
(6XXX ALLOY)

ADJUST
MECANICAL
EXPANSION .026”
(.66mm) GAP
Maintenance HP
Replacing clearance
Example – Nominal ring
dimension =
9.360±.002”⍉
“IF” permanent set is
+.010”/+.020” then turn
diameter back to nominal.

“IF” permanent set is


greater then +.020”
then turn diameter
back to nominal and
replace .026” GAP by
removing material off
.026” .66 mm GAP back of mandrel
Bayonet Stud Maintenance
Replacing clearance
If Bayonet Block
assembles to stem MAINTAIN
but does not turn; CRITICAL GAP
1.52” [38.61mm]

1) Maintain critical gap.

2) Remachine radius
for best fit.

REPLACE RADIUS
(0.09” ON OUTER
EDGE AND 0.06” ON
INNER EDGE)
Bayonet Stud Maintenance
IF bayonet block fits in stem
but does not turn;
1.551±.002
1) Turn bayonet stem one
quarter turn to the left to
give a “GAP” (back of block
to face of bayonet lug) of
1.551±.002”. This can only
be done if block has four
pin slots at back.
2) Turn bayonet stem one half 1.583±.002
turn to the left to give a
“GAP” (back of block to
face of bayonet lug) of
1.583±.002”.
Reduced Float Modification
30 degrees
Modeling

MOVEMENT PRESSURE

DEFLECTION
OF BLOCK
& CONTAINER
Stress Strain Curve for Tensile Loading
Good RRBE3 Performance

Even buildup of
aluminum and no
sign of extreme
wear around
diameter of block
45,000 pushes

8” Billet, SMS 2500 Ton


with Boron Nitride Lubrication
Description Reason for Change
• Date on press • Planned or un-planned change
• Shell / Ring Dia. cold • Aluminum build up behind land
• Gap or stroke dimension • High force during return
• Date off press • Sticking butt
• Number of billets • Blisters on profile
• Shell / Ring Dia. @ 2 positions • Scratches on profile
• Shell / Ring bearing surface • Explosion in container
• Mandrel Dia. @ 2 positions • Broken dummy block
• Pad Depth • Other (describe)
• Threads condition
• Conical faces condition Maintenance Activity
• Angular difference shell / mandrel • Turn shell diameter
• Gap or stroke dimension • Turn mandrel diameter
• Stem connector • Machine back of mandrel
• Bayonet gap dimension • Turn conical surfaces
• Shell Hardness @ 2 Positions • Turn shell bearing
• Mandrel Hardness @ 2 positions • Clean aluminum between shell and
mandrel
• Lubricate
• Other (describe)

Reason for Scraping


• Cracked dummy block or stem adaptor
• Number of refurbishments
Press is not Precisely Aligned

• Press should be in precise physical alignment


• Die should be positioned in the exact centre of
the container
Misalignment
Misalignment
Physical Press Alignment
EMPHASIS MUST ALWAYS BE ON
PREVENTION, NOT CORRECTION
Poor Alignment

Irregular skull around Dummy Block


Poor Alignment

Irregular skull around Clean-Out Block


Clean-out Blocks
• THE CLEAN OUT BLOCK IS USED TO REMOVE
THE THIN LAYER OF ALUMINUM IN THE LINER
WHEN CHANGING ALLOYS

• INEFFECTIVE WHEN THE CONATINER IS


BELLIED

Cold Clean-out Block with


replacement end plates
Cold Clean-out Block
Too much DAG being used
• Lubrication is the final factor in the billet delivery
system
• “Use no lubrication and wipe off any surplus”
• Effective lubrication ensures instant and clean
separation of the dummy block from the butt
• Powder or Liquid Boron Nitride is considered the
ultimate lubricant today
Poor Shear Blade Design

Poor longitudinal or charge welds – poor shear blade design, excessive


shear blade clearance, or lube contamination
Butt Shears
BUTT SHR
Shear Blade
Poor Shear Blade Design

•Smearing and pull-out of


ports.
•Impact on container seal
(flaring risk), and longitudinal
weld quality.
Poor Shear Blade Design

Blister on extrusion surface – ineffective butt shear & pull-out from ports
leading to air entrapment
Container Seal Face
Container Seal Face

Flares from poor container seal – build up on die face, and smearing due to
ineffective butt shearing
Conclusion

• EVALUATE COMPONENTS AS A SYSTEM


• PRECISE THERMAL AND PHYSICAL ALIGNMENT IS
ESSENTIAL
• IT IS TOO COSTLY TO HEAT DIES WITH BILLETS
• JUDGE COMPONENTS BY LIFE AND PERFORMANCE
• ADEQUATE LUBRICATION IS NECESSARY
• CONTAINER SHOULD BE THERMALLY INVISIBLE TO A
HEATED BILLET

MAXIMUM PRODUCTIVITY AND MAXIMUM PROFIT


ARE TODAY ACTUALLY ACHIEVABLE