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WHAT ISSUES DOES A LEARNER-

CENTERED FRAMEWORK ADDRESS?


How to meet the changing
needs of learners that relate
to improved student
motivation, learning
outcomes and retention
How to enhance
student engagement
in needed core
disciplines
HOW TO DEVELOP A
RANGE OF STUDENT
COMPETENCIES AND
ATTITUDES OF
LIFELONG LEARNING
How to create
learner-centered
communities of
practice
Learner-Centered Model: A Holistic Perspective

Learner
Learning
Knowledge
Integration of Factors Impacting
Learners and Learning

•Cognitive and Metacognitive Learning


Learner •Motivational and Affective
•Developmental and Social
•Individual Differences
Evidence Based Characteristics of
Learner-Centered Teachers

 Acknowledge and attend


to each student’s
uniqueness
 understand learning and
motivation to learn
create a positive climate
that feels safe and
secure
assume that all students
want to learn and
succeed
are knowledgeable of
subject matter

provide choice and


personal responsibility
for learning
Teachers use methods that
address the whole learner and
view students as partners in
learning.
Teachers get to know each
learner and form a safe, inclusive
learning community before
academic learning begins.
Teachers see selves as
learners and facilitators rather
than as directors.
Success is measured by
adacademic and non academic
outcomes.
RESEARCH-VALIDATED DEFINITION
OF “LEARNER-CENTERED”
 Reflection of the Principles
 Balances concern with learning and
concern with needs
 Is a complex interaction of qualities – as
perceived by individual learners
 Meaningfully predicts learner motivation
and levels of learning and achievement
STUDENT MOTIVATIONAL OUTCOMES LIKELY
WITH LEARNER CENTERED PRACTICES
• Take responsibility for their own learning
• Engage in learning for understanding vs. grades
• Achieve high academic and personal standards
• Engage in independent learning activities
• Seek further information about topics of interest
• Persist in the face of learning challenges
• Continue to refine their skills in chosen areas
• Go beyond minimal assignments
STUDENT ACADEMIC AND BEHAVIORAL OUTCOMES
LIKELY WITH LEARNER-CENTERED PRACTICES

• High levels of classroom achievement on


indicator such as grades and test scores
• High levels of classroom and school
attendance, retention, and engagement
• High levels of social and emotional skills
• High levels of lifelong learning skills
• Low levels of disruptive classroom behaviors
WHAT DOMAINS OF PRACTICE MOST SUPPORT
LEARNING AND MOTIVATION AT THE COLLEGE LEVEL?
• Practices that support positive relationships and
climate for learning
• Practices that adapt to class learning needs
• Practices that facilitate the learning process and
support critical thinking and learning skills
• Practices that encourage personal challenge
and responsibility
• Practices that provide for individual and social
learning needs
DOMAINS OF LEARNER-CENTERED
CLASSROOM PRACTICES: COLLEGE LEVEL

Provides for
Social Needs

Encourages Personal
Challenge/Responsibility

Facilitates the Learning Process

Adapts to Class Learning Needs

Creates Positive Relationships


METACOGNITION?
CHARACTERISTICS OF LEARNER-
CENTERED TOOLS
• What they are
• Non-threatening
• Tools for learning and change
• Opportunities to share expertise
• What they are not
• Evaluations of competence
• One-size-fits-all strategies
• “Cookbook” teaching procedures
Thinking about
Thinking
Think from SIMPLE to
COMPLEX
METACOGNITON

METACOGNITION METACOGNITION
Application of Learners who
and Knowledge
DEVELOPMENT variables Metacognition do not use
leads one to metacognition
Person be an expert remain to be
variables learner novice
Teaching learners
strategies to Task
develop variables
Metacognition Characteristics Characteristic
Strategy of Expert s of Novice
variables Learners Learner