Vous êtes sur la page 1sur 6

FACTOR AFFECTING

ACCESS TO HEALTH
CARE:

GENDER
WHAT IS GENDER
WHY ARE FEMALES MORE LIKELY TO ACCESS HEALTH CARE
OVER THEIR MALE COUNTERPARTS?

Health
Professional Stigma and
Gender Stereotypes
Availability

Education Time and


Priority
Males
• Accessed 40% of the total Medicare
services Females
• Smaller proportion of GP
consultations and hospitalisations • Accessed 60% of the total Medicare
services
• 16% males enrolled with Medicare
in 2008-2009 • Females are 50% more likely to
access mental health services
• es. Both men and
provided by GP's
women who
• Lack of access caused by a lack of have some • 57% of females had private health
male health professionals, social form of private insurance in 2017–18
norms and values with traditional health
view of masculinity. insurance sit at
• 89% of females aged 15 and over
reported visiting their GP in the last
• Tend to ignore preventative health a rate of 57%
12 months in 2017–18.
(RACGP, 2018)
measures.
• In 2017–18, Australia’s females
• 1 in 6 Australian males did not use claimed over 240 million services
Medicare services in 2008-09. through Medicare, and received an
• By comparison, In 2017-18 males average of 19 Medicare services per
claimed 14 Medicare services per person in that year.
person in that year.
• Between 2002 and 2006, the rate of
avoidable mortality for men was 1.7
times greater than for women.

References: (Beaumont et al., 2018, Commonwealth of Australia, 2011, Department of Health, 2018, RACGP, 2018).
This graph to the left represents the overwhelming
statistics that females across majority of the lifespan are
more likely to attend registered community health clinics
between 2013-2014 in Victoria. Over 5000 more females
were noted to attend a registered clinic aged between 60-
69.
Over 3000 more female registered clients were recorded
for the ages of 40-49 compared to male counterparts.
Almost double the registered health clients between the
age of 20-29 were females.
Registered clients of age 80+ were just less than 1/3
greater in females than males.
(Department of Health and Human Services, 2015).
“Overall, men in the lowest socioeconomic group have far

higher rates of avoidable mortality than men and women in

all other socioeconomic groups. Although men in the highest

socioeconomic group fare better than men in the lowest, they

still have higher rates of avoidable mortality than women in

all socioeconomic groups” (Department of Health and

Human Services, 2015, pg. 10).