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THE EGYPTIAN CULTURE

By: Christine Nchoroko; Tivere Okrakene.


OVERVIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN
CULTURE.

• Egypt is widely known for its Great pyramid monument and it the largest
Arab country (BBC NEWS, 2018).
• It is located in North Africa.
• Spoken Language is Arabic.
• Religions – over 90% are Muslim and 6% are Christians.
COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE
EGYPTIAN CULTURE.
• They are expressive and passionate when they communicate.
• They express happiness and gratitude freely. They also widely express grief or
sorrow, especially during the death of closed ones.
• They can be very blunt during communication; however, the intent is not to
offend the other person.
• It is important to address both the Patient and family members in matters of
patient care and progress.
• The Patient preference should be communicated and addressed on the
care plan e.g. Male or female caregiver preference.
• The appropriateness of touching depends on the people communicating.
• Close families and friends touch one another frequently when
communicating while acquaintances refrain from doing so.
• It is considered inappropriate to walk in front of a Muslim who is praying or
talking to them while they are praying.
• The Egyptians accept gifts but avoid giving flowers as gifts as they are
reserved for weddings, the ill and periods of mourning.
CULTURALLY SPECIFIC FOOD THEY
PREFER
Egyptians cultural foods include kushari, kabab wa kofta, and shawarma.
FOODS THAT MAY INTERACT WITH
MEDICATION
Some Egyptian foods contain garlic and ginger. These two ingredients are
known to have adverse interactions with some medications. An example of
food-drug interaction is taking garlic or ginger and anticoagulant
medication like warfarin and aspirin increases the risk of bleeding.
“MUST HAVE” FOOD

Baladi bread is one food the Egyptians can’t do without. It


is flat bread made with whole wheat and bran. It is eating
on it’s own or with other foods.
Note: In Egyptian Arabic, bread is called “aish” which
means life. Egypt subsidizes staple food like bread since
world war II. In 1977, the government stopped subsidizing
bread and there was a riot. The government reinstated
the subsidy immediately.
WESTERN CULTURE SUPPORT
• Western world support Egyptian cultural food by
• Having stores that sell Egyptian foods.
• Having government program like food stamps that support low-income
Egyptians in purchasing food stuff.
• Having intercultural events and activities whereby cultural foods, cultural values
and ways of life are shared and preserved.
HEALTH CARE PRACTICES-WHO
SPEAKS FOR THE CLIENT
Egyptians engage in healthcare practices that use herbal medicine. They
practice preventative healthcare where precaution is taken seriously.
The family speaks on behalf of the patient (client) and are involved in
important decision making of care. Early in history Egypt astrological
explanations and advice sat alongside prescription of herbal medicines, or
advice on diet and rest.
PRACTICES THAT MAY INTERFERE
WITH HEALTH
• Ramadan/Muslim Fasting – During fasting season some sick Egyptian may
choose to fast. It may be vital for these sick patient to eat for recovery.
• Muslim don’t eat pork or their derivative. Many medications have a gelatin
base derived from pork. Muslim would not take these medications.
• The Older egyptian generation solely relying on Herbal medications rather
than seeking medical advice and care in the hospital.
HOW THE EGYPTIAN CULTURE
PERCEIVE CURRENT HEALTH
PRACTICES IN THE U.S.
Hospital vs. home or rehabilitation
Egyptian culture perceives current health practices positively just like the
United States culture because it has embraced the modern form of health
care provision.
Many Egyptians now go to hospitals when they are ill and take medications
prescribed accordingly.
Family vs. nursing staff
Egyptians culture value family care more than nursing staff which is the
opposite of the United States culture. Family is everything to Egyptians as
they follow instructions more than when given to them by nursing staff.
Medication vs. home remedies
Egyptians especially the old age persons value home remedies and herbal
medicine to prescribed drugs.
The young Egyptians nowadays like their USA counterparts follow doctors
advice more than opting for home remedies.
SPIRITUAL OR RELIGIOUS
PRACTICES.
What spiritual or religious practices does your assigned culture follow?
The Egyptian carry amulets and offer prayers to the saint whose sufferings
correspond to their disease. For example, one of the saint is St Apollonia, the
patron saint of toothache. They believe if you have a toothache and offer
prayers to the St. Apollonia, your chances of cure are high (Corcoran, 2013).
For the muslim community they practice Ramadhan and also pray 5 times a
day and read the Koran.
We have both been raised in Christian families and we all practice fasting,
read the holy bible and also Pray anytime of the day or night ,one is not
restricted to specific time frames.
BIRTH PRACTICES.
Mothers usually received antenatal care from physicians at the hospital but
while some are attended to by traditional birth attendants called “Dayas” at
home.
Dayas train the new mothers on various issues including managing feeding
problems and avoidance of use of oxytocin, promotion of early/exclusive
breastfeeding; prevention and management of hypothermia; skin and
umbilical cord care; and prompt recognition of and referral for danger signs
(Allen, 2014).
SPECIAL PRACTICES TO SUPPORT
THE MUM AND NEW BORN BABY
• Celebration of Sebou – Sebou mean the seventh.’
• A week after birth, family gather and different rituals are done such as making
wishes.
• Lamb are slaughtered.
• Material things are giving to the poor to thank God for his blessings.
• Seven sets of clothes are made and are given to the child as gifts.
DEATH PRACTICES
In Egypt death is feared, accepted as “God’s will.” They bury body
immediately after death possibly before sundown the day of death. First the
body is washed and clothed with “Kafan.” Funeral is held in mosque and
presided by an imam. After funeral, the body is carried to the cemetery by
the male relatives of the deceased. Body is buried facing Mecca.
FAMILY IMPACT
The family remains the central and most important institution in their
everyday lives. Few individuals live independently from their immediate
family or kin, and single-person households are almost unheard of.
Individuals of all classes constantly articulate and defend the importance of
family within the community and the nation as stated by Lang, (2013)
Who leads the family? Are there specific roles?
Egypt is a patriarchal society. The father or the most senior male leads the family.
His role is to provide food, shelter and protect the family from outside interference
and attack.
What is the language?
Egyptians main language is Arabic
Do they respect education for all
Previously Egyptians only practiced a culture that supported boy child education
and neglected the girl child. This has since changed as a result of modernization
and equality campaigns and now they respect education for all.
Family businesses, trades, college, how would you define their focus
Egyptians are much focused people and strive to achieve their goals whether in
business, school etc.
HOW WOULD YOU TEACH AN
EGYPTIAN CLIENT.
Client can be taught using pamphlet. Most Egyptians are educated people
and are able to read and comprehend information. Video can also be used
to teach the Egyptian client.
Teaching should be done before the client prayer time so he/she is willing to
participate. During teaching healthcare provider should be respectful of the
Egyptian culture and maintain a professional distance.
Male client may prefer teachings from male nurses due to patriarchal
upbringing.
Client may need interpreter if not able to speak english.
Nursing Implications.

provide accomodation for afterbirth ritual.


Consider spiritual and religious practices and respect them. An example is if a
patient dies it is important to let the family know early so as to plan for the
funeral arrangements because they bury the same day.
Incorporate ramadan fasting to care plan.
Consider prayer schedule during plan of care and do not schedule important
treatment and education during prayer time frame.
REFERENCES
• Lang, P. (2013). Medicine and society in Ptolemaic Egypt. Leiden: Brill.
• Corcoran, N. (2013). Communicating health: Strategies for health promotion.
Los Angeles: SAGE.
• Allen, J. P. (2014). The art of medicine in ancient Egypt. New York:
Metropolitan Museum of Art.
• BBC NEWS. (2018, April 4). Egypt country profile. Retrieved from
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-13313370