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USDA FOREST SERVICE DEVELOPMENT OF THE 2012 LAND MANAGEMENT PLANNING RULE

Photographer: Bill Lea

Environmental Justice Conference April 13, 2012

National Forest System

National Forest Land Management

National Forest Land Management

National Forest Land Management

National Forest Land Management

National Forest Land Management

National Forest Land Management

USDA FOREST SERVICE DEVELOPMENT OF THE 2012 LAND MANAGEMENT PLANNING RULE

Photographer: Bill Lea

Environmental Justice Conference April 13, 2012

Focus of Our Discussion


National Forest Management Act USFS Planning Rule Land Management Plans (Forests/Grasslands) Project or Activity Decision
We are here: USFS is revising the Planning Rule

Why is a Planning Rule Important?

Provides procedures to amend, revise, and develop land management plans Required by the National Forest Management Act (NFMA) of 1976 Plans set forth desired conditions and guidance for management of National Forest System lands

Past Planning Rule Efforts

1982 Planning Rule All existing land management plans have been issued under these regulations 2000 Planning Rule 2005 Planning Rule Injunction by the courts for not preparing an EIS 2008 Planning Rule Injunction by the courts for an insufficient EIS The 2000 rule legally came back into effect, with transition language allowing the Agency to use 1982 rule procedures

Input
Proposed rule informed by 26,000 written comments, a Science Forum, Tribal consultation, 35 public meetings, and 300 blog comments. Released proposed rule and draft environmental impact statement in February 2011. 28 regional forums 300,000 comments FS has reviewed, analyzed and responded to the comments in the development of the final rule. Published in the federal register April 9, 2012.

What did we do? - Tribes


Sensing - Collaboration+Consultation National Calls for Tribal leaders and members Regional consultation meetings Travel Scholarships One on one consultation between Tribal leaders and local FS line officers

What Tribes Told Us

Emphasis on the importance of proper tribal government to government consultation Include tribes early in the planning process

Combine traditional tribal knowledge with current science


Proactively address climate change through monitoring, mitigation and adaption

What did we do? - Youth

Youth Caucus

Increase understanding Provide a forum for youth to express their opinions Engage youth in the development of the rule

Scholarships Blog, Twitter, Web

What did we do? Publics


National meetings were webcast Regional Meetings Scholarships Webinars, Twitter, Blog

Proof is In the Pudding


The purpose is to guide the development of collaborative and science-based land management plans that promote the ecological integrity of national forests and grasslands. Plans will guide management of NFS lands so that they are ecologically sustainable and contribute to social and economic sustainability; [] have the capacity to provide people and communities with ecosystem services and multiple uses that provide a range of social, economic, and ecological benefits for the present and into the future. These benefits include [] opportunities for recreational,

Engage the Public:

Public participation in all phases of the planning process.

Taking into account:


the

discrete and diverse roles, jurisdictions, responsibilities, and skills of interested and affected parties the accessibility of the process, opportunities, and information

Engage the Public:

including Tribes and Alaska Native Corporations, other Federal agencies, State and local governments, individuals, and public and private organizations or entities early and throughout the planning process

Encourage Participation by:


those interested at the local, regional, and national levels youth, low-income populations, and minority populations private landowners who may be affected federal agencies, Tribes, states, counties, and local governments

Consult
The responsible official shall: honor the government-to-government relationship between federally recognized Indian Tribes and the Federal government request information about native knowledge, land ethics, cultural issues, and sacred and culturally significant sites

Coordinate:

with the planning efforts of federally recognized Indian Tribes, Alaska Native Corporations, other Federal agencies, and State and local governments

Consider:
the objectives of Tribes, Alaska Native Corporations, other Federal agencies, State and local governments opportunities for the plan to address the impacts identified or contribute to joint objectives opportunities to resolve or reduce conflicts

Plans must include direction to:

guide the contribution to social and economic sustainability, taking into account:
Social,

cultural, and economic conditions Sustainable recreation Multiple uses that contribute to local, regional, and national economies in a sustainable manner

Plans must include direction for:

ecosystem services cultural and historic resources and uses wildlife, fish, and plants; for hunting, fishing, trapping, gathering, observing, subsistence, and other activities (in collaboration with federally recognized Tribes, ANCs, other Federal agencies, and State and local governments) opportunities to connect people with nature

Whats next?
FACA Directives including public involvement Implementation

What We Hoped to Accomplish

Create a robust dialogue with groups of diverse stakeholders on what should be in a new planning rule.

Discussion informed by the latest science.


Build relationships that can strengthen future Forest Service work.