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Introduction Social Dimensions of Education

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Interactionist Theories
Interactionist theories attempt to make the commonplace strange by turning on their heads everyday taken-forgranted behaviors and interactions between students and students and between students and teachers.

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Interactionist Theories 2 Types


Symbolic Interactionism Non-Symbolic Interactionism

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symbolic interactionism:
George Herbert Mead and Charles Horton Cooley examined the ways in which the individual is related to society through ongoing social interactions.

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symbolic interactionism:
It views the self as socially constructed in relation to social forces and structures and the product of ongoing negotiations of meanings. The social self is an active product of human agency rather than a deterministic product of social structure.

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symbolic interactionism:
The basic idea is a result of interaction between individuals mediated by symbols in particular language. Symbolic interactionists are, ofcourse, interested not simply in socialization but also in interaction.

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symbolic interactionism:

Interaction is the process in which the ability to think is both developed and expressed.

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symbolic interactionism:
Principles of Symbolic Interactionism 1.Human beings unlike lower animals, are endowed with a capacity for thought. 2.The capacity for thought is shaped by social interaction. 3.In social interaction, people learn the meanings and the symbols that allow them to exercise their distinctively human capacity for thought.

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symbolic interactionism:
Principles of Symbolic Interactionism 4.Meanings and symbols allow people to carry on distinctively human action and interaction. 5.People are able to modify or alter meanings and symbols that they use in action and interaction on the basis of their interpretation of the situation.

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symbolic interactionism:
Principles of Symbolic Interactionism 6. People are able to make these modifications and alterations because, in part, of their ability to interact with themselves, which allows them to examine possible courses of action, assess their relative advantages and disadvantages, and then choose one. 7. The intertwined patterns of action and interaction make up groups and societies.
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Non-symbolic interactionism:
2 Basic Forms of Social Interaction
Nonsymbolic Interaction Meads conversation of gesturesdo not involve thinking. Symbolic Interaction Does require mental processes. The differentiation made by Blumer.
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Non-symbolic interactionism:
Meads approach to symbolic interaction rested on three basic premises. 1.The first is that people act toward the things they encounter on the basis of what those things mean to them. 2.Second, we learn what things are by observing how other people respond to them, that is through social interaction.

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Non-symbolic interactionism:
Meads approach to symbolic interaction rested on three basic premises. 3. Third, as a result of ongoing interaction, the sounds, gestures, facial expressions, and body postures we use in dealing with others acquire symbolic meanings that are shared by people who belong to the same culture.

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Non-symbolic interactionism:
Blumer differentiates 3 types of objects. Physical Objects chair or a tree Social Objects student or a mother Abstract Objects idea or a moral principle

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Non-symbolic interactionism:

A tree will be a different object to a botanist, a lumberman, a poet, and a home gardener

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conceptualisation

Inventing or contriving an idea or explanation and formulating it mentally

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The Four Pillars of Education

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introduction
Learning the Treasure Within, the report of the International Commission on Education for the Twenty-first Century, chaired by Jacques Delors, and published by UNESCO in 1996 provides new insights into education for the 21st Century. It stresses that each individual must be equipped to seize learning opportunities throughout life, both to broaden her/his knowledge, skills and attitudes, and adapt to a changing, complex and interdependent world.
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Four pillars of education


Learning to know, that is acquiring the instruments of understanding Learning to do, so as to be able to act creatively in ones environment Learning to live together,so as to participate in and cooperate with other people in all human activities Learning to be, so as to better develop ones personality and to act with ever greater autonomy, judgment and personal responsibility.
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Four pillars of education


Learning To Know implies learning how to learn by developing ones concentration, memory skills, and ability to think. This type of learning is concerned less with the acquisition of structured knowledge but more with the mastery of learning tools.

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Four pillars of education


This type of learning is underpinned by the pleasure that can be derived from understanding, knowledge, and discovery. Such study encourages greater intellectual curiosity, sharpens the critical faculties and enables people to develop their own independent judgment on the world around them.

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Four pillars of education

A truly educated person needs a broad general education and the opportunity to study a small number of subjects in depth. To learn to know, students need to develop learn-to-learn skills.

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Prepared By:

Michelle Q. Serdon
BEEd-IV

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