Click1 min de lecture
Train Talk
Before radios were invented, train drivers talked to other train workers by blowing horns or whistles. They used patterns of long and short toots. Here are some of the things they said.
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Train Spotti Ng
There are so many kinds of trains. Which would you like to ride? Match each rhyme with the train it describes, then turn the page to learn more. 1. I still chug, even though I’m old. But I need water, hot not cold. 2. Make way. Give me room. I’m fa
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At the Freight Yard
Have you ever waited at a railroad crossing for a freight train to go by? Trains can be 200 cars long, and every car might be carrying something different—corn, milk, TVs, bicycles, steel, sheep, shoes, you name it. Cars going to the same place are
Click2 min de lecture
You’re On A Roller Coaster!
Just like a regular train, a roller coaster is made up of cars that are hooked together in a line and roll along a track. But on a roller coaster, the ride is what counts, not where you go. Your heart pounds. Your stomach drops. You feel like you’re
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Read the Signs
Places like train stations and airports use lots of signs. These signs are the same all over the world. They make it easy for travelers to get around, even if they all speak different languages. Can you tell what the signs in this train station mean?
Click2 min de lecture
Chugga Chugga Choo Choo!
Nowadays, most trains don’t make that sound, but 100 years ago just about every train did. That’s the sound a steam engine makes, and steam is what once made trains go. Here’s how. 1. The fireman shoveled coal from the tender into the firebox. 2.
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Which Way?
Every subway stop has a map that shows where the trains travel. Can you help these kids figure out which train they should take? ■
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Subway Map
These train lines are named by color. The oval spots on the lines show where the trains stop. You can change train lines at some stops. ■
Click2 min de lecture
Rosie Rides the Train
Hi, my name’s Rosie. I live in Chicago with my dad. Last week we rode a train home from visiting my Aunt Ruth in Washington, DC. It was a lo-o-o-ng ride. It took almost a whole day and night. Dad said he couldn’t sit up that long, so he got us a room
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CLICK Magazine
Contributing Editor; John Hansen, Art Director; Pat Murray, Designer; Adrienne Matzen, Permissions Specialist. ■
Click1 min de lectureInternet & Web
READERS Of The Month
Email your child’s photo to click@cricketmedia.com, or send to: Click’s Your Turn! 70 E. Lake Street, Suite 800, Chicago, IL 60601. Photos will not be returned. You, the parent or legal guardian, must email or sign the submission and include a statem
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Make Your Own Train
Cut out the train cars along the dashed lines. Cut the short slits at the bottom of each car to make flaps. Be careful to cut only as far as the dashed lines show. Fold each car along the three solid lines, so it will stand. Tuck the yellow flaps und
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Beatrice Black Bear
The World’s Best Caboose Photographer By John Grandits Illustrated by Paige Billin-Frye ■
Click1 min de lecture
Fish Fun
Make your own aquarium. Just cut out the pieces along the dashed lines. You can tape or glue the fish and plants in place in the fishbowl. Or leave the fish loose, so you can move them around and make them swim. ■
Click1 min de lecture
What Is It?
Do you know what these are? Here’s a hint. They will hatch soon. But the babies that come out will not be birds. ■
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My Fishy Parts
To be a fish, an animal must • live in water, • have a backbone, • breathe underwater using gills, not lungs. Most fish also have scales and fins. Whales, dolphins, seals, and sea turtles have backbones but no gills. They must come to the water’
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Down By The River
Alligator gars live in the Mississippi River. They use their teeth to catch fish, turtles, crabs, and even birds. But they don’t bite people. Why is this fish named after an alligator? It has a long jaw full of sharp teeth! Rainbow trout like coo
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Wings in Water
A huge, flat creature leaps out of the sea. It skims over the waves and flips backward with a splash. Could this strange acrobat be a fish? Yes, it is a manta ray. These diamond-shaped giants live in warm oceans. They can be 22 feet wide and weigh a
Click2 min de lecture
Fish that Fish
When people go fishing, they hook a worm or other bait on a pole and dangle it in the water. The bait lures passing fish who try to eat it and get hooked instead. Some fish go fishing too. Their fishing rods are on their heads. Bait wiggles from the
Click1 min de lecture
Safe In The Sea
Everything wants to eat you when you’re a fish. What do you do? Find a smart way of staying safe! Some fish use colors or patterns to blend in. Then enemies can’t see them. Using colors and patterns to hide is called camouflage. Nobody wants a mouth
Click4 min de lecture
Gary’s World
“If I were a fish,” Katy told her mom, “I would be in water all the time. I would swim in water and eat in water and even breathe in water.” Katy was getting fish for her birthday, so she had been learning all about them. She waved her arms like fin
Click2 min de lecture
Fish Eggs
Skates lay eggs in hard rectangular cases often nicknamed mermaid’s purses. The spiky horns on the ends help anchor the case on the seafloor. Skates and rays are flattened fish that are closely related to sharks. Usually called a spotted ray, the fis
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The Night Workers
The sun has set. You yawn and rub your eyes. As you get ready for bed, some people are just starting work. They have important jobs to do.
Click1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Seeing Stars
Long ago, when people first looked at the night sky, they viewed the hundreds of stars twinkling above as a giant connect-the-dots puzzle. They found pictures that looked like animals and people and other things. We call a group of stars that form
Click1 min de lectureNature
Whooo's Out Night?
Owls are nocturnal. They stay up at night and sleep during the day. Whose calls do you hear after the sun sets? Who sails through the night on silent wings? Whose big eyes help them see in the dark? More than 200 different kinds of owls, all over th
Click2 min de lectureWellness
A Good Night’s Sleep
We spend about one-third of our lives sleeping. If you’re six years old, that means you’ve spent two of your six years asleep. In fact, it’s probably more than two years. Most babies and children sleep not just one-third but closer to one-half of eac
Click4 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Dozens of Cousins, Trillions of Stars
The meadow on Aunt Margaret’s mountain was filled with cousins. “Dozens of cousins, hundreds of cousins, millions of cousins,” Katelyn sang happily as she spread out her sleeping bag. The sun was already setting behind the mountaintop. Soon Katelyn a
Click2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Moon Shapes
Look up at the night sky. Do you see the moon shining? The moon looks as if it changes shape from night to night. But it doesn’t. It doesn’t even shine by itself. All it does is reflect the sun’s light. The sun always lights up half of the moon, jus
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Hootie the Owl
Hootie is a great horned owl like the one on our cover. Despite their name, great horned owls don’t have horns. The pointy bits at the top of the owl’s head are tufts of feathers. They look a bit like ears, but a great horned owl’s ears are hidden un
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How to Make Hootie
1. Cut out all the pieces along the thick black lines. The body piece is the one with the big tan-colored patch in the center. The head piece is the one that is mostly dark brown. 2. Roll the body piece into a cone shape. Tape or glue the white flap
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