Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Stephen Voss
Stephen Voss is a medical general practitioner and astrophotographer based on the South Island of New Zealand, and well known for his images of the Aurora Australis. What got you into astronomy? I grew up in a small rural town with dark skies in the
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Supergiants That Suddenly Fade
Most amateur astronomers observe primarily for recreation and enjoyment, while others like to get scientific and monitor variable stars, asteroid occultations, comets and so on. The latter have the chance to interact with our professional counterpart
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Bits Of Theia Might Be Hidden In Earth’s Mantle
EVIDENCE FOR the impact that created the Moon might lie far beneath our feet. The leading theory for the Moon’s formation is that a roughly Mars-size object, dubbed Theia, struck Earth around 4.5 billion years ago. At the virtual 52nd Lunar and Plane
Australian Sky & Telescope5 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Behind The Shield
GOOD THINGS COME in small packages. Tiny Scutum, the Shield, hosts the Scutum Star Cloud, a glittering condensation in the winter Milky Way. Unfortunately, the Shield can’t block light pollution. Viewed from my suburban backyard with lots of city lig
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Sky Phenomena
3 Venus 0.4° north of Beehive Cluster 4 Mercury greatest elong. west (21.6°) 6 Earth at aphelion (1.0167 a.u.) 7 Moon 6° north of Aldebaran 8 Mercury 5° south-east of the Moon 12 Mars 5° south of the Moon 12 Venus 4° south of the Moon 13 Mars
Australian Sky & Telescope6 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
QHYCCD’s Newest Planetary Camera
FOR NEARLY TWO DECADES ‘lucky imaging’ has been the tried-and-true route to recording the most detailed images of the Sun, Moon and bright planets. Key to the technique’s success is the use of high-speed video cameras that record as many frames as po
Australian Sky & Telescope8 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Halley’s Com Et: A Look Back And Ahead
IT WAS ONE YEAR AGo that skywatchers in some parts of the world enjoyed the view of Comet NEOWISE, a relatively bright visitor that attracted widespread attention. And 40 years from now, in July 2061, the most famous comet of all will be tracing a si
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Cassini And The Speed Of Light
As notable as his list of discoveries is, Cassini also had a few near misses. It was the Danish astronomer Ole Rømer who made the first estimation of the speed of light. He has earned a rightful place in history because of it, though he wasn’t as dev
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Action At Jupiter
The Jupiter observing season is entering its prime with the planet reaching opposition on August 20. Any telescope will reveal the four Galilean moons, and binoculars usually show at least two. Features on Jupiter appear closer to the central meridia
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Second Earth Trojan Observed
A RECENTLY DISCOVERED asteroid appears to be an Earth Trojan, orbiting a gravitationally stable area with only one other known occupant. Amateur astronomer Tony Dunn reported the potential find on January 26 via the Minor Planet Mailing List. Given t
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
A Rejuvenated Comet?
In our May/Jun 2021 issue, I wrote that the new SWAN comet (2021 D1) discovered by Aussie amateur Michael Mattiazzo was of the Halley type with a period of 77 years, based upon orbital data published at the time. However, subsequent orbital determina
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
The Path From Arcturus To Vega
A pair of oft-overlooked zero-magnitude stellar jewels shine low in the northern sky on July evenings. One of them, Arcturus, is in the northwest and starting to descend. Vega is approaching the meridian around 10:00pm. Both are the Alpha stars of th
Australian Sky & Telescope4 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Saturnian Challenges
I recently perused a copy of the fifth edition of Le Ciel by French science writer and journalist Amédée Guillemin. Published in 1877, this profusely illustrated tome contains a beautiful lithograph depicting Saturn based on observations by Otto Wilh
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Pathway to Pluto
LAST YEAR JUPITER PROVED an able guide to finding Pluto, but the gas giant has since moved on, leaving the dwarf planet by itself in the wilds of eastern Sagittarius. However, a distinctive asterism and several bright telescopic stars point the way t
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Two Showers Peak In July
There are two southern showers of interest in July, and a less-well positioned northern one in August. First up we have the Southern Delta Aquariids, which are active from July 12 through to August 23 with a predicted maximum in the morning hours of
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Explaining The Alignment Of Our Galaxy’s Entourage
DOZENS OF DWARF GALAXIES orbit our own, and unlike around many other Milky Way-like galaxies, many of these satellites are aligned along a thin plane, like slices of pepperoni stuck on a thrown disc of pizza dough. While this alignment is unexpected,
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureComputers
New Product Showcase
The Avalon Instruments M-due mount (shown here with two telescopes, not included) has high-resolution encoders on both axes and is controlled by the new Raspberry Pi4-based StarGo2 Pro controller, producing what Avalon says is an all-in-one astrophot
Australian Sky & Telescope11 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
The Magellanic Giant
THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD is a fuzzy smear in the Southern Hemisphere sky, a subject of early humanity’s myth-making. Over time, astronomers determined that it and its companion, the Small Magellanic Cloud, are two separate, smaller galaxies near th
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Lunar Phenomena
Last Quarter …… 1st, 21:11 UT New Moon …… 10th, 01:17 UT First Quarter …… 17th, 10:11 UT Full Moon …… 24th, 02:37 UT Last Quarter …… 31st, 13:16 UT Apogee …… 5th, 15h UT, 405,341 km Perigee …… 21st, 10h UT, 364,520 km New Moon …… 8th, 13:50 UT First
Australian Sky & Telescope3 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Giants Of The Opposition
Mercury (mag. –0.7, dia. 6.3”, Jul. 15) returned to our morning skies in June, and is now rising at about 5:30am at the beginning of July, sitting about 8° below the star Aldebaran. Reaching greatest western elongation (22°) on July 5, it then begins
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Homing In On Hebe
The asteroid vesta is thought to be the parent body of a group of meteorites known as the HED clan. But astronomers may now have uncovered yet another origin story — this one involving the minor planet 6 Hebe, which reaches opposition in southern Aqu
Australian Sky & Telescope11 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Relics Of A Distant Past
ASK ASTRONOMERS WHAT A GLOBULAR CLUSTER IS, and they are likely to show you a picture of a glorious, dense ball of stars. These tight-knit stellar families hover like ancient swarms of bees around the Milky Way and galaxies like it, and they carry un
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Western Australia Leads The Way
It’s great to see that more and more astro events are returning to the calendar as the year progresses. For instance, organisers have announced that the next Perth Astrofest will be held on November 13. Always a great event that attracts thousands of
Australian Sky & Telescope3 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Salvaging The Night
I LISTLESSLY ROLL the rubbish bin down the driveway, my eyes fixed low, aimlessly staring at the footpath ahead. I’m worn down from a long day at work, rattled from the drive home, and, despite the joy my wife and two kids bring me, uninspired for wh
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lecture
Australian Sky & Telescope
EDITOR Jonathan Nally ART DIRECTOR Lee McLachlan CONTRIBUTING EDITORS John Drummond, David Ellyard, Alan Plummer, David Seargent, EMAIL info@skyandtelescope.com.au ADVERTISING MANAGER Jonathan Nally EMAIL jonathan@skyandtelescope.com.au Ian Brooks E
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Star-shredding Black Hole Makes High-energy Neutrino
A SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE some 690 million light-years away tore apart a star — and may have created neutrinos in the process. The IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica detected a single high-energy neutrino on October 1, 2019. The tiny, ghostli
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
The Magnetic Fields Surrounding M87’s Black Hole
THE EVENT HORIZON TELESCOPE (EHT) collaboration has unveiled new images of the black hole shadow at the core of the elliptical galaxy M87, which sits at the centre of the Virgo Cluster some 55 million light-years away. These images, unlike the iconic
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Amateur Astronomers Reveal Galactic Echoes
IN A PROMISING proof of concept, a professional astronomer has teamed up with five amateurs to capture the echoes of long-ago mergers in nearby galaxies. The team is now looking to expand their number of galaxies — and observers. Duilia de Mello (Cat
Australian Sky & Telescope2 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
Astrophotos From Our Readers
Nebula SH2-308, located in Canis Major, is a huge bubble blown in space by the intensely hot Wolf-Rayet star at its centre. This amazing image was produced using a Takahashi FSQ-106EDX4 scope, FLI Proline 16803 camera and HaOIIIRGB filters. Total exp
Australian Sky & Telescope1 min de lectureAstronomy & Space Sciences
The Great Red Spot Gets Smaller… But Stronger
JUPITER’S GREAT RED SPOT (GRS) has been shrinking ever since regular observations began in 1878, from about 48,000 kilometres across to its present width of about 15,000 km. But recent encounters with other storms shrank it further, leading some to p
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