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Restaurant Training Manuals

The restaurant training manuals are detailed and comprehensive in scope, while maintaining a universal quality. The rules can be applied to almost any restaurant training program; you can also supplement with your own specific rules. When ordered as e-books, you will receive them in .doc format so you may modify them to fit your specific restaurant's needs. You may also make as many copies as you need for your staff. Following is the table of contents for each individual manual:

Bus Manual - Introduction - Equal Opportunity Employment - Sexual Harassment - Non-Discrimination - Workers' Compensation - Pay Periods - Drinking - Drugs - Employee Theft - Security - Lost Employee Articles - Customers' Lost Belongings - Breakage - Accidents and Safety - Bulletin Board - Personnel Records - Your Earnings - Parking - Promotions - Liquor Laws - Pre-Shift Issues: Schedules, Shift Changes and Calling In - Appearance & Professionalism - Cleanliness (detailed FOH cleanliness knowledge) - Job Duties and Expectations (includes proper language vs. slang) - Tips and Reporting to the IRS (from the NRA site-official information) - Company Agreement Forms

Host Manual - Introduction - Equal Opportunity Employment - Sexual Harassment - Non-Discrimination - Workers' Compensation - Pay Periods

- Drinking - Drugs - Employee Theft - Security - Lost Employee Articles - Customers' Lost Belongings - Breakage - Accidents and Safety - Bulletin Board - Personnel Records - Your Earnings - Parking - Promotions - Liquor Laws - Pre-Shift Issues: Schedules, Shift Changes and Calling In - Appearance & Professionalism - Cleanliness (detailed FOH cleanliness knowledge) - Job Duties and Expectations (includes telephone etiquette/language) - Calming the Crabby Customer - Tips and Reporting to the IRS (from the NRA site-official information) - Company Agreement Forms

Server Manual - Introduction - Equal Opportunity Employment - Sexual Harassment - Non-Discrimination - Workers' Compensation - Pay Periods - Drinking - Drugs - Employee Theft - Security - Lost Employee Articles - Customers' Lost Belongings - Breakage - Accidents and Safety - Bulletin Board - Personnel Records - Your Earnings - Parking - Promotions - Liquor Laws - Pre-Shift Issues: Schedules, Shift Changes and Calling In - Appearance & Professionalism - Cleanliness (detailed FOH cleanliness knowledge) - Job Duties and Expectations (includes proper language vs. slang) - Calming the Crabby Customer - Server's Script

- Tips and Reporting to the IRS (from the NRA site-official information) - Company Agreement Forms Below you will find excerpts from each manual: Excerpt from the Bus Manual
Basic Responsibilities You are expected to be able to fulfill many different tasks for several people, including your servers, hosts, managers and guests. The following checklist includes many of the required tasks and could include more or less: - greeting guests when you approach a table - serving bread and water -pre-bussing - clearing tables - re-setting tables - maintaining tables and floor appearance - cleaning and re-stocking service stations - overall floor maintenance - re-filling beverages and bread baskets - cleaning spills - taking out garbage - wiping down high chairs and boosters with clean bar towel Table Setting Guide Before service, make sure that each table in the restaurant is set correctly. 1. Check that all tables are stable and do not wobble. 2. Wipe the chairs and be sure they are clean and set at an appropriate length from the tables. 3. Check that the tables are clean on the top and edges. If plants or ledges are nearby, they should also be free of dust and dirt. 4. Examine the salt and pepper shakers, sugar bowl and any table tents/promotions. The shakers and bowl should be full and clean; sugar and sugar substitute should be stocked. Position these items at the centers of tables according to your restaurants procedures.

5. Inspect the table settings. Be sure everything is clean and aligned properly. 6. Be sure the floor is clean around and under the tables. Pick up trash. Whenever you have extra time, perform extra duties to make sure our guests are taken care of. Side work duties are assigned and are expected to be carried out at the end of a shift to the expectations set forth. Suggestions for extra duties offer pepper for salads and soups clear and crumb tables between courses and replace soiled silverware serve beverages remove trays and tray jacks left in a walkway/path change out ash trays, light cigarettes, bring toothpicks, assist with coats Clearing and re-setting tables When clearing a table, have a tray with you for entire removal of all items. Take care not to put your fingers inside of glasses, used or clean. When wiping the table down, brush excess and large crumbs into your hand or onto a plate or napkin so they arent just thrown onto the floor for clean-up at the end of the shift. Move salt and pepper shakers and sugar container and any other items off to the side while you clean the entire table. Brush off chairs and booths so guests do not have to brush crumbs off their seats before sitting down. If using a large tray, come prepared with as much as possible for the clean set-up of the table. The set up of all tables should be the same. If you have room on your tray after you are finished with the set-up, take a quick look around and make sure there arent any other dishes from any other tables that you can pick up. Cover your tray of dirty dishes with a napkin before taking back to service area. There will be times when it is necessary to replace silverware or dishes between courses. Servers should communicate with you as to what they need you to do for them. There are a few basics to handling dishes, glassware and silverware, whether clean or dirty. - When handling glassware of any type, always handle them by the stem or base section of the glass or cup. Guests dont know how clean your hands may or may not be. It doesnt matter if the glasses are clean or dirty; do not get into the habit of grabbing glassware by the rims or sticking your fingers into several glasses at once to more quickly bus a table. It is a completely unsanitary practice and horrifying to guests who witness you doing so! - Plates of food should be served with your fingers splayed under the plate to balance, while your thumb is at the very outermost rim of the plate to avoid touching peoples food. A service napkin may also be used to deliver a plate of food.

- Silverware should only be handled by the handle, never the end that is put into the mouth. -The clearing of dishes and glasses should be done from the right of the guest, using your right hand to avoid awkwardness. As when you serve food, you should clear dishes for everyone at the same time. When its clear that everyone is finished, begin by asking the host or someone elses permission to take things away. Examples: May I take these away for you? May I take your plate? Avoid slang terms and phrases, such as: All finished? Still workin on that? Asking permission is polite. Saying other things can be offensive, especially if someone isnt finished eating and you attempt to take away his/her plate. Never make a guest feel uncomfortable. The safest way to do that is to always ask permission to remove dishes and be reasonably sure a guest is finished eating. Take plates and other items from the right of the guests. Anything that will no longer be needed should be cleared, including entre plates, bread plates, silverware and glassware. The only things that should be left are those items still being used, such as coffee cups, spoons for coffee, wine and water glasses. If wine glasses are empty and there is no more wine to be drunk, remove them. Understand the proper etiquette that the servers follow and do the same. We want our guests to feel as if the entire staff is there for the sake of their hospitality and comfort, and you are!

Excerpt from the Host Manual


Basic Responsibilities You are expected to be able to fulfill three different hosting tasks: seating, podium and phones. Greeting is a given that must be done by all employees all the time, not just our hosts! Answering the Phones involves: taking reservations providing detailed information about the restaurants operations and policies routing phone calls to the proper source when the information is not available to you

confirming reservations handling sales calls Seating guests means you are responsible for: expediting the seating of our guests clearing and resetting tables when necessary explaining certain promotions at the time a party is seated checking and straightening up the restrooms and lobby area As the Podium host person, you will also have to answer phones, as well as: greet guests as they arrive assign tables or assist the manager with this by following proper procedures assist the other two aspects of hosting as needed ensure the guests are pleased with their visit by inquiring as they depart saying good-bye and thanking guests for their business These three positions are intertwined, which is why you may find yourself filling all three in a single shift. Also be aware that the management can and will ask you to fulfill tasks not necessarily associated with the position of the shift for which you were scheduled. These tasks may include cleaning areas or items in the restaurant, assisting with paperwork or changing displays for promotional items as well as assisting in other areas of the restaurant.

Excerpt from the Server Manual


SERVERS SCRIPT A large part of excellent customer service is suggestive selling. Suggestive selling is suggesting beverages or food items along the course of the guests dining experience. Your job is to guide their dining experience and make it as enjoyable as possible. Suggesting and describing items along the way gives your guests an idea of what to order, which can save you time and extra effort. Planting a seed is the suggestion of an item and assuming the sale is the assumption that your suggestion will be taken. In the following script, note the language the server uses to plant the seed and then to assume the sale. It doesnt work all the time. Whether or not your guests take every suggestion you offer is irrelevant. You are displaying your knowledge of the menu and offering the best possible experience for our guests. The very generic script that follows can be modeled into any style of service. Its an ideal script and by no means does it imply exactly what will happen at every table just because you are suggestive selling. Also, this script suggests a more formal atmosphere; you can change the language to fit your style and your restaurants style. Just keep the basics in place! Greeting and Offering of Beverages

You: Good evening, my name is _____ and Ill be your server this evening. May I bring you a cocktail, glass of wine, perhaps a gin and tonic? He: Yes, shell have a glass of red wine and Ill have a vodka tonic. You: Do you like a lighter red or something a little fuller-bodied? She: Something fuller-bodied. You: I have a very nice Zinfandel XYZ is one of my favorites. Another good wine is the ABC Cabernet Sauvignon very tasty! (points them out on the wine list) She: The Zinfandel sounds great! You: Very goodSir, for vodkas, I have Absolut, Chopin? He: Do you have Ketel One?

Startling facts regarding the reasons businesses lose customers: Customer dies - 1% Moved away - 3% Influenced by friends - 5% Lured away by the competition - 9% Dissatisfied with product - 14% Turned away by an attitude of indifference on the part of an employee -68%
The Greeting/Introduction

This is the most crucial contact you will have is with the guest, for this is where the tone is set. You must attend the table as quickly as possible, and here is where the opportunity to "read" the table is made readily apparent.Introduce yourself along with a proper salutation, prior to taking the beverage order. Learn to listen and observe. Are they discussing business, is this a celebration, are they unwinding after a busy day, or do they just wish a pleasant dinner.Whatever the case you must glean the tenor of their needs. Even when busy, you must at least find the time to acknowledge their presence, and let them know you will be with them as soon as possible. Let me say this at the outset. YOUR DUTY AS A WAITER IS TO FACILLITATE THE GUESTS DINING EXPERIENCE. You are a non-entity, and they are GUESTS. They are ladies and gentlemen, not" folks", "you guys", or "you all. Remain polite and cordial,but not overly familiar. My rule of thumb is: If it's not a menu item, we shouldn't be discussing it. As time passes, you will have repeat guests that become "regulars/requests" and the above

parameters will ease a bit. During this first contact with the guest, you will need to ascertain whether or not there are time constraints, if they want to relax awhile with their beverages,or move right on to appetizers or dinner. The specialties need to be described,recommendations made, if they wish, as well as a brief overview of the menu in terms of what comes with the entrees,and any other available options i.e., a la carte(unincluded) items like soups, sides etc. Mentally, you are a WAITER(you too ladies), a waiter attends the guest,and sells via product knowledge. You are not a SERVER (although for ease of reference you may be referred to as such), a server just takes orders! In most cases, dinner is served in 5 courses, excluding cocktails, after dinner drinks and formal dinners with more than one entree. Appetizer, soup, salad, entree,and dessert. Guests having like courses should be served together. The exception will be if a guest wants soup or salad or some variable thereof with which to start their meal. When serving food, it should be to the guests left with the left hand,and the plate rotated in a way the protein(as opposed to the veggie or starch) is closest to the guest. Beverages are served from the right with the right hand, the rule being, whichever hand is the least intrusive,and makes your body most open to the guest is preferred, backhanded serving is hackish. Soiled plates are cleared from the right. Whether handling stemware,flatware,china etc. one should only touch the stems,handles or rims respectively. In the case of glassware with no handle, by the center of the glass or lower.Coffee/tea/espresso/cappucino service, handle loop should be between 3:005:00 o'clock with respect to the guest. In most fine dining venues, there is,or should be a reference point from which a guests position number is determined. It may be the seat closest to the kitchen, or when facing a specific direction in the dining room. Where ever it is, the order proceeds clockwise from that point,or the first seat to the left. All items consumed must be in the right seat number, thus, someone other than you may serve the table when the need arises.

7. Presenting Wine & Champagne

1 Sommelier/wine waiter brings the bottle of wine (white or ros) or Champagne ordered to guests table, chilled at the right temperature in an ice bucket, 3/4 filled with ice and water, and places it on the wine stand, with a smile and pleasant eye contact. For red wines,

sommelier/wine waiter brings the bottle to guests table in an appropriate wine basket. Red wine is served at a temperature of 15-19 degrees Celsius. For white, ros wine and champagne: Sommelier/wine waiter should proceed as follows: Must approach the host from the right Should take a folded wine cloth in the palm of his left hand Must place the base of the bottle on the wine cloth Holds the bottleneck with the right hand, label facing the host and presents the wine by saying: Your bottle of (name of wine and vintage if any), Mr or Mrs (name of guest). For red wine: Sommelier/wine waiter proceeds as follows: Must approach the host from his right Holds the basket in the left hand ensuring the label is facing the host. After guest has inspected label, waits for the hosts approval and acknowledges guest approval by saying: Thank you Mr or Mrs (name of guest). For Champagne, White or Ros wine -sommelier/wine waiter places the bottle in the wine bucket. For Red wine -sommelier/wine waiter places the bottle in the basket/wine holder on the table, prior to opening it. OPENING OF WHITE AND ROSE WINE BOTTLE Sommelier/wine waiter stands next to the wine stand, facing the guests, holds the bottle firmly while keeping it in the bucket and proceeds to open the bottle, with a smile as follows: Uses the knife of the corkscrew set and cuts the foil capsule neatly around the neck, under the lip of the bottle. Removes the foil capsule and puts it in his pocket. Inserts the screw into the centre of the cork and twists it in a Clockwise direction carefully until screw is 3/4 inserted in the cork. D) Places the lever on the lid of the bottle, holds it tightly with the left hand and pulls upwards with right hand firmly and slowly to make sure that the cork does not bend. Once the cork is pulled 3/4 out of the bottle, uses fingers of the right hand, holding the bottle in his left hand, to remove the cork, ensuring there is no pop sound. Unscrews the cork from the corkscrew Ensures that no particles fall in the wine

Removes the bottle from the buck Wipes the bottom part of the bottle to avoid drips. Pours wine for the guest/host who has chosen the wine to taste. OPENING OF RED WINE BOTTLE For red wine, sommelier/wine waiter stands next to the host, holds the red wine basket/red wine holder, while keeping it on the table, with the left hand and starts to open the bottle. Uses the knife in the corkscrew set to cut the foil capsule neatly around the neck, under the lip of the bottle -removes the foil capsule & puts it in his pocket. Inserts the screw into the centre of the cork and twists it in a clockwise direction carefully, until the screw is 3/4 inserted in the cork. Places the lever on the lid of the bottle, holds it tightly with the left hand and pulls upwards With the right hand firmly and slowly to make sure that the cork does not bend. (Note: For long type corks, e.g. Burgundy, pull the cork 1/2 way and twist again the screw and pull up the cork completely). Once the cork is pulled 3/4 out of the bottle, uses right hand fingers, Holding the bottle in the left hand, to remove the cork, ensuring there is no pop sound. Unscrews the cork from the corkscrew Ensures that no particles fall in the wine Sommelier/wine waiter pours the red wine for the guest/ host who has chosen the wine to taste. OPENING OF CHAMPAGNE BOTTLE Sommelier/wine waiter stands next to the wine stand, facing the Guests and proceeds to open the bottle as follows: Removes the bottle from the bucket Approaches the host from the right Takes a folded wine cloth in the palm of his left hand Places the base of the bottle in the wine cloth Holds the bottleneck with the right hand, label-facing guests and presents the bottle to the host. Upon hosts approval,

Holds the bottle of champagne firmly in the left hand removes the lead cap with the right fingers and puts the cap in the waistcoat pocket. Opens the champagne (muzzle) by putting the left hands thumb firmly on the top of the cork and twists the bottom of the bottle. Allows the cork to go out smoothly without a pop sound puts the cork in the waistcoat pocket and tilts the bottleneck away from the guests table. TASTING & POURING OF WINE Sommelier/wine waiter offers the host to taste the wine after opening of the wine bottle, with a smile and eye contact, as per the following steps: Holds the bottle in the right hand, label facing the guests Keeps the thumb around one side and fingers around the other

The Brilliant Basics to Exceptional Service


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Holds a wine cloth in the left hand

Keeps bottle height 2 cm from the rim of the glass. Pours a little wine (1/5 of glass) and offers the host to taste by saying: Mr or Mrs (name of guest), for your approval, please. Waits for the host to approve Checks guests satisfaction by saying: Mr or Mrs (name of guest), is the wine to your satisfaction? Starts pouring for women first, then male guests, and lastly the taster For red wine, sommelier/wine waiter holds red wine glass (never touch the glass) by the stem with the left hand, while pouring the wine with the right hand. If the host does not approve the wine, sommelier/wine waiter offers to change the wine Immediately and extends an apology by saying: Mr or Mrs (name of guest), I apologize for the inconvenience; please allow me to change the wine immediately. Identifies guests who will have wine, before proceeding with pouring of wine

Pours from the right hand side 1/2 2/3 of the wine glass, label always facing the guests, women first and guest/host who has chosen the champagne last, by saying: May I, Mr/s (name of guest)? Places the bottle back in the bucket (for white & ros wines). For red wine, places the wine basket on the table. Checks on the wine glasses during the meal and refills glasses as soon as the latter are 1/3 full, by saying: Excuse me, may I pour some more wine for you, Mr/s (name of guest)? Sommelier/wine waiter withdraws from guests with a courtesy bow and a smile, and wishes Them a pleasant day/evening before retiring, by saying: Mr/s (name of guest), have a pleasant (time of the day). TASTING & POURING OF CHAMPAGNE Sommelier/wine waiter offers host to taste champagne after opening of bottle, with a smile and eye contact as follows: Moves to the right hand side of the host. Ensures that the right thumb is on the green of the bottle and supported by the four fingers, and holds the champagne flute by the stem with the left hand while pouring the champagne. Pours slowly 1/3 flute of champagne and offers it to the host to taste By saying - Mr or Mrs. (name of guest), for your approval, please. After hosts approval, identifies guests who are having champagne, serves women first, and the guest/host who has chosen the champagne, last. Pours slowly up to 3/4 flute of champagne Twists bottleneck 45 at the end of pouring, to avoid dripping. Uses a nicely folded wine cloth held in the left hand to catch any dripping. Places the bottle back in the wine bucket after serving, and refills flutes whenever they are 1/2 full (unless specified otherwise by guest).

The Brilliant Basics to Exceptional


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For champagne, sommelier/wine waiter holds champagne flute by the stem (never Touch the glass) with his left hand while pouring the champagne with the right hand. Sommelier/wine waiter withdraws from guests with a courtesy bow and a smile, and wishes them a pleasant day/evening before retiring by saying: Mr/s (name of guest), have a pleasant (time of the day). WINE BY THE GLASS Sommelier/wine waiter ensures that wine ordered by the glass is poured at the table after presentation of the label, and tasting of the wine as per above standard. Sommelier/wine waiter approaches the table within one minute of empty glasses, makes his intention known, and enquires whether guests would like another glass of same or different wine by saying: Please, Mr/s (name of guest) would you care for another glass of the same wine or would you prefer a different wine? May I recommend (name of wine and grape variety) which will be excellent with the Next course (fish, meat.)? SERVING A SECOND BOTTLE OF WINE Sommelier/wine waiter proceeds with a smile and pleasant eye contact as follows: Places new glass for tasting, next to the hosts existing glass Approaches the host from the right and presents the second bottle of wine as per standard, by saying: Please Mr/s (guest name), your bottle of (name of wine and vintage if any). Opens wine as per Opening of Wine Standard upon hosts approval. Sommelier allows the host to taste new bottle. Pours gently one fifth of wine in a fresh glass with a smile and pleasant eye contact by saying: Mr or Mrs (name of guest), for your approval, please. Waits for hosts approval by saying: Mr or Mrs (name of guest), is the wine to your satisfaction? Sommelier serves the second bottle of wine, with a smile and pleasant eye contact. On approval from the host, refills all glasses with a smile and pleasant eye contact, women first as per Tasting & Pouring of Wine standard. Pours wine last in hosts glass (not in tasting glass). Places the bottle back in the bucket Refills the bucket with ice and water as required and wipes the outside surfaces of the Bucket. Refreshes and/or refolds the wine cloth and places it back on the wine bucket. Removes the empty bottle from the bucket Removes the tasting glass on a tray For red wine: places the wine basket on the table.

The Brilliant Basics to Exceptional Service


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Removes empty red bottle of wine from table.

If second bottle of wine is of a different type or vintage from the first bottle, change the entire glassware on the table. Clear empty glassware from the table.

Table setting refers to the way to set a table with tableware such as eating utensils and dishware for serving and eating. The arrangement for a single diner is called a place setting. The arrangement varies across various cultures. The rules for laying a table are not rigid. They are followed to facilitate dining and making the table neat. The basic rules for laying the tables are given below:

1. Table Linens: Table linen has to be laid properly. A white cloth is preferred but not mandatory. The only rule is to make sure that linen patterns and china patterns dont clash. 2. Chargers: Chargers or dinner plates should be placed on the table first. Chargers are decorative elements that are placed underneath plates to add color or texture to the table. Each plate should be set in the center of the place setting and each place setting on the table should be set equidistant. The rest of the components used to set a formal table will be set with the dinner plate in mind. If a charger is used, soup and melon bowls will be placed on top. The charger will generally be removed just before the main course. 3. Napkins: Linen napkins should be folded elegantly and placed in the center of the dinner plate. 4. Silverware: Silverware is to be placed in order of use. In other words, the diner will start at the end and work his way in. The first course will use silverware farthest from the dinner plate, while the last course will utilize the silverware closest. Place all silverware an inch from the tables edge.

5. Knives: Set knives on the table to the right of the dinner plate. Technically, one should only use a knife if one is cutting meat; however, up to three knives can be placed on the table, in order of use. Blades should face inside, towards the table setting. 6. Forks: Forks are to be set to the left of the dinner plate in order of use. In most cases, there are three: one each for seafood, the main course and the salad. When dining formally, salads are generally served at the end of the meal. 7. Spoons: Spoons are set to the right of the knives in order of use. If there is a melon course, this spoon will be set closest to the plate with the soup spoon on the end. If there is a dessert spoon, this will be set above the plate. Coffee spoons are set on the saucer when its time for dessert. 8. Glasses: Glasses are set above the plate to the right in order of use. From left to right: Water glass, red wine glass, white wine glass, champagne flute (if ordered). Dessert: Dessert plates and coffee / tea cups will be set out after dinner. If a fork is to be used with dessert, this will be placed on the dessert plate. A dessert spoon should have already been set above the dinner plate. Coffee spoons should be placed on the saucer. Coffee / tea mugs arent used for a formal dinner H ospitality is such a professional service where each & every staffs has to maintain hundred percent professionalism with pure grooming and hygiene. Here are some tips for every waiters to maintain grooming and hygiene:

1. Daily Shower has to be taken-this is must. 2. You should be well uniformed, well fitting, spotless. 3. Pay especial attention to your hands. Keep it clean. Always wash your hand after going to toilet or smoking or touching anything. 4. Shoes should be well polished, comfortable, clean, conservative and neat designed. 5. Male waiter and servers should be well shaved.

6. Females should use light makeup. 7. No excessive jewellery should be uses. Ear rings may be allowed but it will depend on organisational policy. 8. Use soft aftershave and perfumes. Do not use strong one which could distract guests. 9. Avoid bad mannerisms like scratching your face, making sounds by your fingers, showing bad sings, cleaning nose, fingering through hair etc. 10. Try to have nice deep sleep to keep yourselves fit for your daily work.