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TIPPLED IN4/OE Ir

1653 East Main Strxt

RochMtw, Nn fork

(716) 82 - 0300 - Phone

U609

USA

THE CANADIAN BOY SCOUT

.

THE BOY SCOUTS

PATROlf

NIS MA/ESTY K'INC GEORGE f

THE CHIEF SCOUT

SIR ROHERT BADENPOWELL.

CHIEF SCOUT FOR CANADA

Hu Exc,a,ncy Ih, G,n>*rHor.Gtn*ral EARL GREY, G.C.M.C.

DOMimOR COUNCIL

I

COMMISSIONERS

Chief Commianioner: Colonel

Sherwood. M.V O and

by the Dominion

"sutant commiMioners. Appointed

Councl to mspect. and to act as it, local repr.Mn.ative

PROVINCIAL COUNCILS

Composed of leading representative

each Province, to father the Local Associa.ion

men in

I

WCAL ASSOCIATIONS

Composed of local

representative men interested

of Scoutmasters. To

movement locally.

in work among boys and

dmmister and develop the

With Local Secrrt;,rv

to keep Register and to report to the Commissioner.

TROOPS

Under Scoutmasters. Containing three or more Patrol,

I

PATROLS

Under boy leaders. Containing six to eight Scouts.

SCOUTS

Including: Silver Wolves, Kings Scouts.

All-round Scouts. 1st class, md class Scouts, and Tenderfoots

DEDICATED BV PERMISSION

TO

HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS

THE PRINCE OF WALES

AND

HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS

PRINCE ALBERT

THE BOY SCOUT

THE

CANADIAN BOY SCOUT

A HANDBOOK FOR INSTRUCTION

IN GOOD CITIZENSHIP

BY

SIR ROBERT BADEN-POWELL

K.C.B

K.C.V.O., LL.D,

TORONTO

MORANG & CO., LIMITED

191

nil

CorraiGHT, Canada,

191 i, bt

LIEUT.^ENERAL SIR ROBERT S. BADEN-POWELL.

PREFACE

'Seeing that the Boy Scouts movement

promises

wdely m Canada and that the training- in the Old Coum^ «

to spread so

^"^\^''^-"* -"^-t-- *« those z:i^:i

and I sincerely hope that it

may be

T::XeTr °

/

found of use

'^ "'"^"""^ '"P'"°^"^^ ^^'^ original book o1

^"' ^-"^"^^^ ^"'^ *« Canadian

Tn'/r^' " r'r'

land,

Scouts m their own

Scout

by Scoutmasters and Scouts in their endeavor

u«vor m

to

attam eflScieucy.

EXPLANATION OF SCOUTING

(See also Chapter X.J

N.B.~ Sentences in italics throughout the book are addressed

to Scoutmasters {Instructors).

By the term " scouting " is meant the work and attributes of

backwoodsmen, explorers, and frontiersmen.

In giving the elements of these to boys we supply a system of

games and practices which meets their desires and instincts, and is at the same time educative.

From

the

boys'

point of

view

Scouting

puts

them into

fratermty-gangs, which is their natural organization, whether

for games, mischief, or loafing; it gives them a smart dress and

egmpments; tt appeals to their imagination and romance; and

it engages them in an active, open-air life.

From the parents' point of view it gives physical health and development; tt teaches energy, resourcefulness, and handicrafts;

tt puts into the lad discipline, pluck, chivalry, and patriotism;

tn a word, tt develops ''character,'^ which is more essential than

anything else to a lad for making his way in life, and which is

yet practually untaught in the schools.

The method of instruction in "Scouting" is thai of creating

tn the boy the

desire to learn for himself, and not by drilling

knowledge into him.

From the national point of view our aim is solely to make the

rtstng generation into good citizens. We avoid mUitary training

for reasons given in Chapter X, and we do not interfere with the

reltgton of the boy.

Moreover, Scouting appeals to boys of every class, and can be

carrted out tn towns just as well as in the country.

Experience now shows that by using this handbook any one can

teacn

scouttng to

boys, even though he may have no

previous

knowledge of it himself. He should begin mth small numbers,

ix

X The Canadian Boy Scout

<^ patrol oriwo of eight boys.

A great step is to hn^ n lu^

^'^'^^ ^ *^t

,,J^l^u

street

sufficient knowledge in anv ons

who TanZZTcZ

he can generaUy get a friend

and gtve his troop the required instruction

«.fn*"*"' ^ .T^ ^ '^ ^"^ ^'Ives, by their work

^h^^ii^ng. Various ways of niaking monJyZe^Zi;

B^^I'U'u^^^^^ ^ '"^^^^ o'Sanizations, such as Boys'

Brigades, Clubs, Schools, Training-ships, etc.

^

Toronto, January, igri.

RS.S.B.-P.

tnqutrtes should be dtr^ to the Secretary,

CAPT. R. J, BlRDWmSTLE,

Castle Building, Ottawa.

CONTENTS

PREFACE EXPLANATION OF SCOUTING

.

•••••vii

'*««

Camp Fire Yam. No.

Camp Fire Yarn.

struction

Camp Fire Yarn. Camp Fire Yarn.

Camp Fire Yam. Camp Fire Yam. Camp Fire Yam.

No.

No.

No.

No.

No.

No.

CHAPTER I

SCOUTCRAFT

i. Scouts' Work

2.

Summary of Scouts' Course of Inl

"• *u

3. Boy Scouts'

4.

Scout Law

Organization'

'.

[

CHAPTER 11

Campaigning

5.

6.

7.

Life in the

Open

.

Sea Scoutine

Signals and

Command.

.*

.*

.

.*

^

"2

22

SO

,,

58

&

CHAPTER III

Camp Life

Camp Fire Yam. Camp Fire Yam. Camp

Fire

No. 8. Pioneering

No. 9. Camping

Yarn. No., o. Camp ct,king.

*****''

.*

]

[

[j^J

Camp Fire Yam. Camp Fire Yam. Camp Fire Yam.

CHAPTER IV

Tracking

No. 11.

Observation of «Si«n«

No. 12. Spooring .

»

No. ,3.

Reading « Sign " or Dedu^on .*

ai

.

"7

,'50

xu

The Canadian Boy Scout

CHAPTER V

Woodcraft, or Knowledge of Animals .nd Nature

^amp Fire Yarn. No.

14. Stalking

Camp Fire Yam. No. 15. Animals

Camp Fire Yarn.

No. 16.

Plants

CHAPTER VI

Endurance

for Scouts, or How to be Strong

,7. How to Grow Strong

Health-giving

Habits

'

.

'

Camp Fire Yarn. No. Camp Fire Yarn.

No. 18.

Camp F.re Yarn. No. ,9. Preventbn of Disea«

FAGB

'59

166

182

188

201

209

CHAPTER VII

Chivalry of the Knights

Camp Fire Yarn.

Camp Fire Yarn. Camp Fire Yarn.

No. 20. Chivalry to Others

No. 21. Self-discipline .

No. 22. Self-improvement

.

.

.

.

222

231

238

CHAPTER Vni

Saving Life, or Ho to Deal with Accidents

ro», , V

CaZ V-" v'"'

v-amo

^7

Fire Yarn

Them

^- ''

•'

I

,.

^'

a

"^'^^'^

'^'«:p«»reu lor Accidents

'^' Accidents

jj-

.

/* ^"'"^"*» ^"' "°* *« "^-^ *ith

Camp Fire Yarn. No.' 25. Helping Others"

'.'

',

250

^^^

CHAPTER IX

Patriotism, or our Duties as Citizens

Camp Fire Yam. Camp Fire Yam.

No. 26. Our Empire

No. 27.

.

.

Citizenship

'

*

*

'

Camp Fire Yarn. No. 28. United we Stand -Divided we FaU ."

Scouting for Boys .

INDEX

.

CHAPTER X

'f

295'

305

±

Scouts Camp.

Brownska Island

POOLK.

T5 «^ CcuuuuL^ t^

-I

OKc *^

0^4

Ql^ /^H#w i^f^-H^

ZItt

Wfe- f>^ /C^ k«^;^ fc; ,,,^

dr

H*,iu,j^ ^

'^

'^'

C tft; !<> >»>» Cwf 6-tt

Y#w

^

'2^' jn»5-

^^^^

o^ wtnk <U^ «^ ^

ft'***' ^«.5J©v»

Zfi

^

A

To Every Canadian Bov:

Scouts' Camp,

Bkuwnska Island,

'^'^'

WM"afim^a"tl\n';r?.

w!frh .ni

Tnv on!

obe^ orders

«" ^ ^'^ '" "^y'^'^^ »" officer

who.

a"-round Scout, who could follow a track, hide

? 'T"^- u" '^5*'"^' »"^ ^" " brave and hwdy m *"' '^'^ °"' failing-he coulS^nS

'^"''-

^"*

One day we were lying in ambush to surprise

a force of

^?ot°loTan?3

was

to

Me

low

and

not

to

'h-

stir

^^ °^^^" --' i"at evr^^^

out of our hidine-olare

Hi.f tuii

away from the

column to do a bit of Scouting oi

shots were heard.

Shortly afterguards

his own

He had^ met a SJ^""

Scout; they had fired at

each other; the Boer wa^ killed l^H

Other' Boer S^oute hearrn/the

Scout there euessid that

soXy fefrcSed the

^ our aUush in time

for a fdloS who

8,^'^

in

ereat

our Scout mortally wounded.

shots came up and finding a British

more of us must be in theSieighborhood, country more carefully and thuf discovered

ran?? t" 7'" ^^^

^^^ ^ ^^^^ "<>

°'^'"' '^'" ^'^"S'^ ^' -"^^ be a

other lay^^ From what I

have seen of you Canadian boys I have a

adm.rat.on for you.

but to be perfectly

You are already good Scouts in tht tSds

reliable you mustllso be sure ?hat

yoSVre

^

orders, however distasteful hey may

^

cheerily

discphned and can obey

be without any hesitation and

nLTadfm;"rb^ii%''.^

men

men.

If thlJo?

«

thev

^

tern ory

Canada can be a very big nation in a few years if each one

^" -aking it

^

^ rn'adon":

or wealth, it is made by its

energy who work toSther

are men of grit and

l.ke afootbalf team, each in his place aniT' playiiTrthe «me "

win ^nThev^^S? mJS %"' ^^ ^^'^^^ °^ tL"f aptaifley

Tull

!, *J

'"f .

'* a Srea nation.

througn the

countrj' will

y

If they only lc:rf

iS

^

that IhJ.

***

**"*

c;i,

game, each in his own way, it is not

succeed against others.

lads I

So— play up, Canadian

o^ personal comfort, think for

" Plav the iram«» »

yoS'Smrand wo kVa°rS'

good Scout who can S

each one of you, to be an all-round

rehed upon in a Ught comer to stick It out and JSy orfer^

Your friend,

ROBERT BADEN-POWELL,

xrii

CHAPTER I

SCOUTCRAFT

NOTES TO nrSTRUCTORS

Instruction in scouting should

be given as far as possible thromh

^

^"

practices, games, and competitions.

*^^«/T '^"^^^ organized mainly as team matches, where the

tngt

' """"^ ^'^ " ^'''^^^' "^ ^"^y ^<^'^-

str'J^tVSplL'' '^'' '' '^ ^ ^^ ^^^ --^^ -- in-

fJ.t^'ff

masters

^''"'* '" ^'^ ^''"^ ""' '" ^'^'"^^

"^y

where necessary to suit local conditions

^^ ^i^^ hy scout,

wMchu!^l ftl^'- r "^''^y "-^^^ "' suggestions, upon

pelS^ZXZ

'''' "^^ ^-^lop further game's,

cL

Severai of the games given here are

founded on those in Mr

Thompson Seton's "Birchbark Roll of the Woodcraft I ^ians^'

'(t'i f'^rU^' ^''*'^''''" ^^^^' Hunt), "Quick

S"

"Lid~Z ^{^^''^^»S games are quoted from the book

tJLt'^Vf-''

tite first week.

It

'"^^^f'^^f"' f^ distribution of the work

for

ts merely a sugg^Hon and in no sense binding.

* The Canadian Boy Scout

much i™BiUo«yeiSSJaJf«tal"'Jf.'i «."'" i?!'- '^^

WiWr EVENING

INDOORS

^/«/«, efc.

^^^' "^^ demonstrations or lantern

Form patrols, and give shoulder knots.

FOLLOWING DAY

P/fctical work, outdoors

Jlternat.es according to wkether in tJn follows iZuntry, indoors or

if possible, as

~

MORNING

Parade, hoist Union Jack

and

Scouimg game: e.g., -Scout Meets Scour (see M,e ,2\

salute

it

chalk (to be rJJJ^^;^;; '

Tie knots.

''

" "'^'^ ""''' ^'^* '^

Make ration bags, leather buttons, etc

i^uite%7;7zli7Jr

sS^{TZTjZr' ''"^ '^ '''''' '^'' >^- Joint,

Prjiise scout's pact (see

Tmlge dtslancfs (see page 101).

page

21 <)

Scouts' Work

-

AFTERNOON

Play an extended scouting

game {see "Games^

Or tndoors tf wet '^Ju-Jitsu," "Scouts' War DairJ" h.^

War Dance,

box-

page «)

tng, scouts' chorus and rally, etc.

EVENING

{see7age%'. ^'''''' ^''"^ ^^" *'"'* or from books recommended

Or rehearse a scout play,

Patrols

hold debate, Kim's game etc

continue practtce in

these throughZ the week in

with find

<"

gams

games

Zex^

or

exer-

thetr crwnUtneor under the scoutmaster,

ctseson the following Saturday afternooii

CAMP FIRE YARN.

SCOUTS' WORK

No. 1

Peace Scouts "Kim" Mafeking

Peace Scouts

»ni f^^^l ^J^'y-

and the great

Canadian boy wishes to

help

Empire to which he belongs in some way or oThe7

his country

JoX a -^uJ: '' "'^^*^ '^ ^^" ^° - -"y -^ that is'by

hiAu °"*' ^^ ^°^ ^''°!'' '" generaUy a soldier who is chosen for

J^H

TT' ^"u^ P*"^'' to go out in front of an army in^ar to

a'bourtlt'" ''' '"^"^ '''' ^"^ ''^'' to the coZandeT aS

But, besides war scouts, there are also peace scouts ie men

of'^abSiSS'' rrse'"^

Pm^?r ^u S^^^

^'^

r T""

the

^^^^ ^^^-- the ^- ^n'S

frontiersmen of all parts of the

te-Afric^ Z'l'^K °-^ "^""''^ America, the hunters ol

otTo;i1?o^J[^.^^^^^^^^

real men m every sense of the word, and thorougSy^p'L^ot:

II

i

4

The Canadian Boy Scout

how to look after their health when £

away^^^^^^^^

tors, are strong and plucky, are ready to faceVnrd'aiSL^

^aLT^'r^""'^-

take their bves

and

^\¥p each other. They are?ccttomed to

in their

hands, and to fling then f^.wn Sou? °"'

their country by doSg ^

their percx>nal comforts and desires

They

do not do all thiS

duty to their

^'

hesitation if they can help

They give up everything,

in order to get their work done.

heir own amusement, but because it is their

' fellow-countrymen, or employers

The history of the Empire has been

made' by British ad-

nation,

'

for hundreds

^"^^«^«

venturers and explorers, the scouts of the

of years past up to the present time.

Ihe Kmghts of King Arthur, Richard Cceur

Crusaders earned British chivalry into distant pS

d.- Lion and thp

o" tt

QueettlS't^^; rii^?"!"

« Si

fu

,

*°,'

^^^^

Jf"

^"^'?' ^°^^^^ ^"d sailors of

unknown dangers of strange seas

powerful

enemies

'

to tLkeTd

""*

as well as the known dangers of

hold new lands for the expansion of England

countSs"

w

tto-ough

ifVu

^^^'''-""^ '" '"^^' ""^^^ "P --

and

Livingstone pushed their wav

of Afri^

Dav^s FraTk^

^S^Ve" B^akef a'

P^

'

^^'^^^y

the savage deserts and forests

hn and Ross braved the ice and snows of the Arctic rerions

;

Bovd^l^'T' 'T'

Boyd

of Jt^Zf-^

Alexander, who

^'^ "^^^

the good name and

?he

.fn^

^"'°"^' '^' ^''^' ^""ter, and L^Sant

recently crossed Africa, are peace scouts

^"? \^'^ ^/'"^ ^"' °^ ">^^y hundredsVf the SmS

^r^ ^'""^ ^" ^^'^ d^'^ to the

present spread

ofZ

power of Great Britain in all pai

And there have been women scouts of

the natioi too mirh

shlpwrkSi" crew

Wd

CriS

k

and

as Grace Darhng, who risked her life to save a

Florence Nightingale, who nursed sick soldiers ST^e

mJI

^!!^^«,gsley. the African explorer; Lady

Afnca and Alaska;

and many devoted ladV missionaries

nurses m aU parts of the

Empire. These have shown Xt rirls

scouting

while th^are voSi

as they growTdef

taken uobvanv

as well as boys may well learn

and ^ be able to do useful work in the worid

It is a grand hfe, but it cannot suddenly be

f^t tL^r^and'*^ ^°"^' '''' ''' "'^^^^ ^ '^- P-P-^ ^-S^

(( Kim »

Scouting also comes in very useful in any kind of life vou like

aty. Sir William Crookes

who goes ,n for science