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TEST de LANGUE Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Defense

GRILLE-REPONSE
Lire le texte. Reporter vos réponses aux QCM sur la grille de correction.
Barème : Absence de réponse : 0 point
Bonne réponse : 2 points Mauvaise réponse : -1 point

Vous devez cocher la case qui correspond à votre réponse. Vous pouvez imprimer la grille-réponse présentée ici, p. 1. Vous y
reporterez vos réponses aux 40 questions (compréhension : 1-20, puis grammaire-vocabulaire, 21-40). Ensuite vous pourrez
consulter la grille-réponse « correcte » qui figure à la page 9. Ainsi que pourrez calculer le total des points obtenus, ici sur 80.
Ensuite vous lirez les conseils donnés, p. 10. Lors du test du 10 avril, le total des points est calculé sur 200 compte tenu du
coefficient qui s’applique aux groupes de questions (coeff 1, 1-5 ; coeff 2, 6-10 ; coeff 3, 11-15 ; coeff 4, 16-20 ; coeff 1, 21-23 ;
coeff 2, 24-26 ; coeff 4, 27-30 ; coeff 1, 31-33 ; coeff 2, coeff 33-36 ; coeff 4, 37-40).

a b c d Points
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q5
Q6
Q7
Q8
Q9
Q10
Q11
Q12
Q13
Q14
Q15
Q16
Q17
Q18
Q19
Q20
Q21
Q22
Q23
Q24
Q25
Q26
Q27
Q28
Q29
Q30
Q31
Q32
Q33
Q34
Q35
Q36
Q37
Q38
Q39
Q40
TOTAL

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TEST D’ORIENTATION EN ANGLAIS
CECI EST UN SPECIMEN pour vous aider à vous évaluer

Durée de l’épreuve : 1 heure.


Aucun dictionnaire n’est autorisé

ATTENTION : le test 2010 aura lieu le 10 avril 2010

Lire le texte.
Reporter vos réponses aux QCM sur la grille de correction.

Barème :
Bonne réponse : 2 points
Absence de réponse : 0 point
Mauvaise réponse : -1 point

The Murray is the lifeblood of Australia's farming country a legendary river that thundered 1,500 miles from the
Snowy Mountains to the Indian Ocean. Now, it's choking to death in the worst drought for a thousand years,
sparking water rationing and suicides on devastated farms. But is the 'big dry' a national emergency, or a warning
that the earth is running out of water?

Australian farmers always know someone else who is doing it tougher. They pride themselves on their resilience.
They take pleasure in living in 'a sunburnt country of droughts and flooding rains'. Conservative and deeply
sceptical, many dismiss global warming as hogwash. But with unprecedented water scarcity and the Murray, the
country's greatest river system, on the verge of collapse, warning bells are ringing around the globe.

Financially, the drought is pinching as far away as the UK, hiking up the cost of bread in British supermarkets as
wheat prices reach a 10-year high. Symbolically, it cuts much deeper. Commentators are looking on, nervously,
wondering if what is becoming the norm in Sydney could be the future for Sydenham.

Professor Tim Flannery, an Australian environmental scientist and an international leader on climate change, has no
doubts. 'Australia is a harbinger of what is going to happen in other places in the world,' he says. 'This can happen
anywhere. China may be next, or parts of western USA. There will be emerging water crises all over the world.' In
Kenya, the herdsmen of the Mandera region have been dubbed the 'climate canaries' - the people most likely to be
wiped out first by global warming. In Australia, the earth's driest inhabited continent, it is the farmers who are
on the frontline.

This extended dry spell began in 1998. Four years later came the one-in-100-years drought. Last year was declared a
once-in-a-millennium event. Every city, bar Darwin in the 'top end', is facing water restrictions. Rivers are reduced to
a trickle a child can jump across. Old Adaminaby, a town drowned by a reservoir 50 years ago, has resurfaced
from its watery grave. Distressed koalas have been drinking from swimming pools. The list goes on.

The extent of the crisis was illustrated in January, when the Prime Minister, John Howard, announced a A$10bn
(£4.3bn) package to seize control of the Murray-Darling basin, the nation's food bowl, accounting for 41 per cent of
Australia's agriculture and A$22bn worth of agricultural exports. The region covers an area the size of France
and Spain combined and is home to almost 3m people; its famed waterway, the River Murray, no longer holds
sufficient water to flow out into the sea. Despite Howard's massive rescue plan to overhaul the water system, six
months later the irrigation taps to the region's farmers were turned off.

Malcolm Holm knows just how bad things can get. A dairy farmer with a bullish smile, Holm, 39, is a respected
pillar in his local community of Finley, on the flat plains of southwest New South Wales (NSW). He depends, as do

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more than 50,000 other farmers, on the River Murray. I first meet Malcolm and his wife, Jenny Wheeler, 47, in
Sydney in mid-July.(…)

Last October, with no water flowing into the major dams, the NSW government faced an unparalleled situation.
Following last year's lowest inflows into the Murray on record, they miscalculated how much water was available
across the board. 'Carryover water' worth millions of dollars, which had been saved and paid for by farmers for
irrigation, was slashed by 20 per cent without consultation. Three weeks later, farmers were hit with another 32 per
cent cut. Today they are on zero allocation. (…)

In March 2006, Professor Flannery's The Weather Makers was published in the UK, spelling out in incisive detail
what awaits us unless we decarbonise our world by 2050. Described by Sir David Attenborough as 'in the league of
the all-time great explorers', and the 2007 Australian of the Year, Flannery combines a Gaian approach with hard
science. The result: Australia's answer to Silent Spring. When I speak to Flannery, he's recovering from the flu after a
particularly cold, damp July. Floods and violent storms have caused havoc along Australia's eastern seaboard,
beaching one 40,000-tonne tanker like an aluminium dinghy. I put it to Flannery that the difficulty with global
warming is that many areas are facing freak flooding. 'General modelling suggests that every degree Celsius of
warming leads to a 1 per cent increase in rainfall globally,' he explains. 'But these downpours are not uniform,
causing intense bursts and downpours of rain in some places and not in others. We are learning about this 1 per cent
effect as we go.'

In his book, Flannery describes the dramatic decline in winter precipitation in southwestern Australia since the Sixties.
The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation has forecast that on the east coast, rainfall could
drop by 40 per cent by 2070, along with a seven-degree rise in temperature and an increased chance of bush fires.
Last November, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report added to the predicted misery, stating that
'the annual flow in the Murray-Darling basin is likely to fall by 10-25 per cent by 2050', resulting in a decline in
production from agriculture and forestry.

Five years ago, during the last major drought, I travelled through western Queensland, across a fragile, red-baked
landscape that was obviously not suited to the hooves of millions of cattle and sheep - there are no Australian
native animals with cleft hooves - and met farmers whose dreams were crumbling to dust. Back then, there was
virtually no mention of global warming. The problem was attributed to the dry, cyclical conditions caused by El Nino,
a powerful climatic phenomenon linked to the Pacific Ocean, which drives rain-bearing clouds away from the
continent.

Fast-forward to July 2007 and few scientists doubt the 'big dry' is caused, in part, by climate change. Some refer
to it as a climate shift; others, like Flannery, who matches Al Gore in his Armageddon-like predictions, are
unequivocal that it is a foretaste of what's to come. As the first developed nation to experience such a prolonged dry
spell, it's no wonder that the rest of the world is looking on to see how Australia copes - and what lessons can be
learned.

Claire Scobie
Sunday August 5, 2007

The Observer

Guardian Unlimited © Guardian News and Media Limited 2007

N. B : the whole context is to be taken into account when deciding on the meaning of the
following excerpts.

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Q1. The Murray is the lifeblood of Australia's farming

A) Farming in Australia is an economic sector whose survival depends on the Murray river

B) Australia is a farming country and the Murray river basin is its centre

C) The preservation of the Murray river is bringing new life to Australian farming.

D) Almost all members of Australia’s farming community were born in the Murray basin.

Q2. the worst drought for a thousand years, sparking water rationing and suicides on devastated farms.

A) due to the shortage of water and the suicide of farmers living on their wrecked farms, the situation represented the most serious
drought in the history of Australia.

B) the water shortage is so serious –the worst in a thousand years- that even bottled mineral water has been rationed, while farmers
are driven to suicide on their ruined farms.

C) suicides among farmers living on their stricken holdings and a restriction of the amount of water at people’s disposal: these are
the immediate effects of the country’s unprecedented drought.

D) It was the worst prolonged shortage of rain for centuries, and it has led to a black market in water and the suicide of some
farmers following intimidation.

Q3. Conservative and deeply sceptical, many dismiss global warming as hogwash
A) In Australia, where public opinion is predominantly wary of change, many people consider the global warning theory to be
scientifically groundless.
B) Among Australian people those who are traditionalists and who dislike new ideas have decided not to focus on the gravity of
the problem of global warning.
C) Conservative supporters of the government are wary, they dismiss global warning as mere propaganda.
D) Since they are often suspicious of change, many Australians don’t want to alter their habits in order to adopt to climate change.
Q4. hiking up the cost of bread in British supermarkets as wheat prices reach a 10-year high

A) the consequences included a rise in the price of bread in British shops, the aim of which was to give Australian farmers their
highest prices in the last ten years.

B) Whereas wheat prices are at their highest for ten years, supermarkets in Britain have been able to offset the rise in the coast of
bread.

C) As wheat prices reached their highest level or 10 years, British supermarkets have taken advantage of the opportunity to play up
the bargain price at which they sell bread to their customers.

D) the problem of drought is also causing bread prices to rise in British retail outlets, as world wheat prices are at their highest for a
decade.

Q5. wondering if what is becoming the norm in Sydney could be the future for Sydenham

A) people are now hoping that the methods for tackling global warming today being tried in Australia will be adopted in Britain in
the near future.

B) people ask themselves if Australia is soon going to be a model for English-speaking world in the move away from intensive
farming methods which have contributed to global warning.

C) the situation leads people to consider whether what is becoming part of daily life in Australia may actually be the shape of
things to come in Great Britain.

D) many people marvel at the way trends which start in Sydney soon find themselves taken up around the world, in places like
Sydenham UK.

Q6. In Australia, the earth’s driest inhabited continent, it is the farmers who are on the frontline.

A) Australia is the driest of the world’s populated continents, and farmers there make up the majority of the population.

B) In Australia which, of the earth’s inhabited continents, is certainly the one with the lowest supply of water, it is the farmers who
are currently bearing the brunt of the problems caused by the drought

C) In Australia, the world’s driest inhabited continent, it is the farmers who are at the head of the dole-queue of people who have
lost their jobs because of the drought.

D) In Australia, farmers are now fighting the battle to prevent Australia from becoming the world’s driest densely populated
continent.

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Q7. Old Adaminaby, a town drowned by a reservoir 50 years ago, has resurfaced from its watery grave

A) Following half a century under water as a result of a disaster during the construction of a reservoir, the town of old Adaminaby
has at last been resalvaged.

B) Fifty years ago Old Adaminaby was abandoned and sunk as part of the programme for building huge dams. Today, the intention
is to revive the town so that it can attract new visitors in search of the traditional Australian heritage.

C) In an bizarre ghostlike development, Old Adaminaby, a town destroyed by the bursting of a dam fifty years is now on dry
ground again.

D) A town which was abandoned by its population and submerged fifty years ago due to the construction of a dam has now become
visible once more.

Q8. the nation's food bowl, accounting for 41 per cent of Australia's agriculture and A$22bn worth of agricultural exports.

A) the Murray basin eats up most of the natural resources of Australia, almost half its agricultural production. This enables the
region to produce agricultural exports worth A$22bn to the Australian economy.

B) the Murray basin is now a horn of plenty, providing 41 percent of Australia’s agriculture and the overall value of its exports is
expected to reach A$22 billion, given the rising global demand for wheat.

C) Almost half the country’s food supply and a vast share in Australia’s exports have already evaporated in the dried up Murray
river basin.

D) the region, which accounts for a major share of Australian food exports and which is a crucial location for the country’s farming
industry, is in fact vital as a provider of food.

Q9. Despite Howard's massive rescue plan to overhaul the water system

A) Even though the prime minister announced a comprehensive plan, the aim of which was to introduce a new system intended to
save water.

B) Though the prime minister’s plan was an ambitious one, it overlooked the crucial issue of the water irrigation system.

C) The prime minister introduced an ambitious plan designed to redefine the way the country managed its water supply: this did not
however resolve the problems.

D) Notwithstanding Howard’s announcement of a rescue plan, very little has yet been done to pump more water into the system.

Q 10 Malcolm Holm knows just how bad things can get

A) It’s no use telling Malcolm Holm that conditions can get tough. He’s too optimistic to listen to any bad news.

B) Malcolm Holm has no illusions about the future: he knows that things can only get a lot worse.

C) Malcolm Holm had been warned that things could get bad. He also knows that bad things can get better.

D) Based on his direct personal experience, Malcolm Holm has no illusions as to how badly the plight of farmers can actually
deteriorate.

Q11 with no water flowing into the major dams, the NSW government faced an unparalleled situation

A) the absence of water in the big reservoirs means that the NSW authorities now have a unique opportunity for repair work.

B) faced with a situation where the major reservoirs were starved of water, the NSW authorities had to deal with a situation which
was unlike any previous crisis.

C) with the dams running dry, the NSW authorities were ill-prepared for the unexpected demand for water from the Murray basin
farmers.

D) the drying up of the water flowing into the reservoir system: this is not a scenario that the NSW government likes speaking
about.

Q12 spelling out in incisive detail what awaits us unless we decarbonise our world by 2050

A) giving a stark and vivid picture of the kind of future lying ahead of us if we fail to bring carbon emission levels significantly
down by 2050.

B) telling people the basic message about the kind of carbon-free atmosphere they can achieve by 2050.
C) though there are some details to be filled in, we now have a clear picture of the state of the planet in 2050 if decarbonisation is
completed.

D) giving gripping details about the scenario we’ve all been longing for if we fail to adopt decarbonisation policies.

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Q13 Flannery combines a Gaian approach with hard science

A) Flannery brings to the issue the language and method of mainstream science. He adds to this a touch of ecological earth-
worship.

B) Flannery’s personality shows evidence of an explosive reaction of scientific toughness against New Age mysticism.

C) Flannery has confused the rules of science with the discourse and tones of new age mystery.

D) Deep down, Flannery isn’t really a scientist, he’s fundamentally committed to a Gaian cult of eco-harmony.

Q14 Floods and violent storms have caused havoc along Australia's eastern seaboard

A) Australia’s east coast has been dramatically reshaped by the floods and by the massive storms.

B) Extreme weather conditions have contributed to the fame and reputation of the Australian east coast.

C) The chaos experienced on Australia’s eastern coast could have resulted from the severe flooding and storms in the country.

D) The country’s east coast has been severely affected by a spate of flooding and storms.

Q15 General modelling suggests that every degree Celsius of warming leads to a 1 per cent increase in rainfall
globally,

A) The models used by the scientists will enable the country to achieve a 1 percent overall increase in rainfall. This will compensate
for a 1 degree increase in average temperature.

B) Most scientific research models incline decision-makers to aim for a 1 percent rainfall increase coupled with a one-degree
temperature increase.

C) Scientific models currently being developed are too general: they wrongly suggest that a one-degree increase in temperature
will lead to a 1% increase in global rainfall.

D) Mainstream scientific theory predicts a 1% rise in rainfall in the world as a whole for each additional Celsius degree in average
global temperatures.

Q16 rainfall could drop by 40 per cent by 2070, along with a seven-degree rise in temperature

A) Some estimates suggest that by 2070 Australia might be facing a 40 per cent reduction in rain, coupled with a 7 per cent rise in
average temperature.

B) scientists do not exclude the possibility of a 40 per cent increase in the volume of rain dropping on the region, coupled with a
seven-degree rise in average temperature.

C) Unless the rise in temperatures can be limited to seven degrees, the reduction in rainfall could be as high as 40 percent.

D) There’s sure to be a 40 per cent drop in rainfall by 2070, unless the temperature rise is kept to seven degrees.

Q17 a fragile, red-baked landscape that was obviously not suited to the hooves of millions of cattle

A) the country’s dry and dusty soil had to be transformed to make it more convenient for the vast herds with their millions of cattle.

B) Such a fragile desertlike landscape was not initially appropriate for huge cattle herds.

C) such a brittle, dried-up landscape was clearly not the appropriate ecosystem for the feet of Australia’s huge herds of cattle.

D) Such a dry hostile terrain clearly damaged the hooves of the cattle in the vast herds grazing there.

Q18 few scientists doubt the 'big dry' is caused, in part, by climate change.

A) In fact there are even some scientists who are now in no doubt that climate change is actually one of the causes of the prolonged
Australian drought.

B) There is a now a widespread scientific consensus that global warning is a contributing factor in the country’s prolonged drought.

C) Some rare scientific experts cast doubts on the idea that the prolonged drought has been caused by global warming.

D) Not many scientists contend that the glasshouse effect has been one of the consequences of the prolonged, massive drought.

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Q19 the rest of the world is looking on to see how Australia copes - and what lessons can be learned.

A) Outside Australia, there is widespread interest in the way the country manages to deal with the problem. Countries are also keen
to see what is to be learnt from the Australian experience.

B) Other countries don’t really expect Australia to be able to deal with the problem of drought, and they will no doubt draw some
negative conclusions concerning the technical expertise of the country.

C) the international community clearly doesn’t expect Australia to face up to its responsibilities. There will be lessons to be drawn
from this.

D) The international community has merely stood idly by, while Australia has had to face up to the problem and learn all the
lessons.

Q20 What is remarkable is the seismic swing among ordinary Australians over the past 12 months.

A) Ordinary Australians have maintained their traditional optimism, despite the various national disasters which have hit the
country in the past 12 months.

B) It has been a major surprise to see the numbers of Australians who have suffered from severe mood switches over the past
twelve months.

C) Everybody has noticed that there has been a drastic transformation in the way of life of ordinary Australians in the past 12
months.

D) The past year has witnessed a comprehensive and unexpected upheaval in the way ordinary Australians view this question.

GRAMMAIRE

Q21. … his privileged background, he's not arrogant.

A) although B) despite of C) in spite D) despite

Q22. ...annoys me is that he's always late.

A) which B) that what C) what D) all that

Q23. I've been ... he is very depressed.

A) announced B) warned against C) explained D) told

Q24. Don't put the blame … me!

A) with B) for C) to D) on

Q25. We ... work a lot at the time.

A) will B) used to C) were used to D) should

Q26. It never rains but it …

A) shines B) drops C) dribbles D) pours

Q27. You … check the batteries.

A) shall better B) should better C) had better D) would better

Q28. He could go by car or by train; he chose ...

A) the last B) the later C) the latest D) the latter

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Q29. I haven't seen her … the last time I was in London.

A) for B) since C) during D) while

Q30. Is this play worth…?

A) seeing B) to see C) seen D) see

Q31. The news we received today … reassuring.

A) were B) are C) had been D) was

Q32. Let everybody enjoy ….!

A) himself B) ourselves C) oneself D) themselves

Q33. The price of copper has soared … 20%.

A) of B) up C) at D) by

Q34. He … everything.

A) used to doing B) is used to doing C) has the use to do D) was used to do

Q35. My friend, … car has broken down, will have to come by train.

A) whose B) which's C) whose the D) which the

Q36. What do you do? -I've worked as … broker … years!

A) a …during B) a…since C) ø …many D) a …for

Q37. It has been years since she ... here.

A) has not come B) is coming C) comes D) came

Q38. We have got to be careful: we've got … left.

A) a few money B) few money C) a little money D) little money

Q39. He talked them … signing the contract.

A) in B) and they accepted C) out D) into

Q40. I wished he … which way to go!

A) had known B) knows C) knew D) know

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Test de langues : SPECIMEN N° 1 :
REPONSES : 1-40 : Corrigé :

GRILLE
Q1==A Q21==D
Q2==C Q22==C
Q3==A Q23==D
Q4==D Q24==D
Q5==C Q25==B
Q6==B Q26==D
Q7==D Q27==C
Q8==D Q28==D
Q9==C Q29==B
Q10==D Q30==A
Q11==B Q31==D
Q12==A Q32==D
Q13==A Q33==D
Q14==D Q34==B
Q15==D Q35==A
Q16==B Q36==D
Q17==C Q37==D
Q18==B Q38=D
Q19==A Q39==D
Q20==D Q40==A

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En fonction de votre score……

 Vous avez obtenu un score de 30 points ou plus…. Vous avez un bon niveau d’anglais,
en compréhension et en grammaire. Vos chances de réussite au test sont bonnes, si vous avez effectué le test
dans les conditions du test du 10 avril, durée une heure, sans dictionnaire.

 Vous avez obtenu un score entre 20 points et 30 points. Votre niveau d’anglais vous
donne des chances raisonnables d’avoir un classement favorable lors du test, à condition d’avoir effectué le
test dans les conditions du test du 10 avril, durée une heure, sans dictionnaire. Compte tenu du nombre de
candidats qui se présentent, le score nécessaire pour avoir un bon classement en « droit-langues » correspond
au minimum à un score de 25 points sur ce test spécimen. Le score requis pour un bon classement en
« économie-anglais » ou en « histoire-anglais » est légèrement inférieur.

 Vous avez obtenu un score entre 15 points et 20 points. Compte tenu de votre score
lors de ce test d’autoévaluation, vous avez des chances moyennes d’avoir un classement favorable lors du
test, si vous avez effectué le test dans les conditions du test du 10 avril, durée une heure, sans dictionnaire.
Si une de ces filières correspond à votre projet d’études universitaires, vous devrez améliorer vos
compétences en compréhension et en grammaire en vue du test du 10 avril. Compte tenu du nombre de
candidats qui se présentent, le score nécessaire pour avoir un bon classement en « droit-langues » correspond
à un score qui est plus élevé que celui que vous avez obtenu lors de ce test spécimen.

 Vous avez obtenu un score entre 8 points et 15 points. Compte tenu de votre score lors
de ce test d’autoévaluation, vos chances d’avoir un classement favorable lors du tes du 10 avril sont
incertaines, si vous avez effectué le test dans les conditions du test du 10 avril, durée une heure, sans
dictionnaire. Si une de ces filières correspond à votre projet d’études universitaires, vous devrez améliorer
de manière significative vos compétences en compréhension et en grammaire en vue du test du 10 avril.

 . Vous avez obtenu un score inférieur à 8 points. Vos chances d’avoir un classement
favorable lors du test du 10 avril sont faibles. Si une de ces filières correspond à votre projet d’études
universitaires, vous devrez améliorer de manière significative vos compétences en compréhension et en
grammaire.

ATTENTION : Quel que soit votre score lors de ce test d’autoévaluation, vous avez bien entendu le droit de vous
inscrire au test du 10 avril, si vous relevez de la procédure d’inscription en 1e année (procédure APB ou dossier
transfert).
Pour une inscription au test de langue du 10 avril vous devez impérativement vous inscrire entre le 20 janvier et le
20 mars. Aucune inscription n’est possible en dehors de ces dates.
Vous devez choisir une seule filière parmi entre les trois qui sont proposées :
 « droit-langues » : (langues proposées : anglais, espagnol, russe, italien, allemand),
 « économie-gestion/langues » (langues proposées :anglais, espagnol, allemand)
 « histoire-langues. » (langues proposées : anglais et espagnol).

Pour la filière que vous choisissez, vous avez le droit de vous inscrire pour plusieurs parmi les
langues qui sont proposées. Exemple : si vous candidatez pour la filière économie-gestion/langues,
vous avez le droit de vous inscrire pour le test d’anglais, d’allemand, et d’espagnol du 10 avril
2010.

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